En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?


Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - April 10, 2013

From: Denton, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany
Title: Fragrant Texas wildflowers
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Hello! I am researching native Texas wildflowers and I am looking specifically for flowers with a pleasing aroma. Is there anyone who has made a list that includes how the flowers smell? Do you know of any flowers that have a particularly nice scent? Thank you for your assistance!


You can find a list of Fragrant Texas Natives on The Fragrant Garden website.  It includes trees, shrubs, perennials and vines.

Here are those on the list with a link to information and photos on our Native Plant Database.





You can also find more plants listed on the Recommended Native Plants for Landscaping in the Texas Hill Country from the Kerrville Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT).  Do a search using "fragrant" on the page to find them.  Here are a few that appear on that list that don't appear on the Fragrant Texas Natives list above.

Many of the members of the Family Lamiaceae (Mint Family) are aromatic.  Here are a few that are Texas natives:

Here are a couple of other fragrant wildflowers:

There are others that I haven't found, I'm sure.  We have been asked this question before so please read the answers to previous questions (4813, 4522 and 7259) to learn a few more. 

Perhaps you could do more research on Texas natives with fragrance and write the definitive book on the subject!





More General Botany Questions

What is a Demaree Rose?
August 14, 2013 - Have been told the Apache Plume is the Wild Rose after which the Wild Rose Pass north of Ft. Davis was named. However, other research indicates it was the Demaree Rose. What is true and are there ...
view the full question and answer

Brownish-gold worm-looking things on loblolly pines
May 08, 2015 - We have a large loblolly pine that each spring drops thousands of brownish-gold "worm" looking things (about 1/2 to 1" long). Do they have a name and what is their purpose?
view the full question and answer

Why plants grow in very hot or very cold areas from Edison NJ
October 06, 2013 - Why can some plants grow where very cold or very hot?
view the full question and answer

Source for DNA sequencing of Opuntia species
March 04, 2014 - Hi Mr. Smarty Plants, I am trying to do a Opuntia speciation study, and rather just identifying the species by morphological comparison, I would also like to go a little deeper by comparing the DNA...
view the full question and answer

Source for records of Pleistocene flora of Central Texas
December 16, 2013 - Part of your answer to a question from October 12, 2010 is "..moreover, the evidence goes even further back than the 1800s. Studies of Pleistocene deposits from Central Texas showed ancestral cedar p...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center