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Monday - October 22, 2012

From: Cherokee, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Vines
Title: Vine for a fence in San Saba County, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I want to plant vines on a deer proof fence close to my house for privacy. Are there any vines that stay green year round? Also what breed of vine would you recommend for several hundred feet of fence line? Don't care about flowering, only concerned about hardy fast growing plants that will cover a fence. Thanks.

ANSWER:

Here are a list of native vines that have been reported on the USDA Plants Database as growing in San Saba County or in an adjacent county.  Unfortunately, there are no evergreen native vines for San Saba County.  Ampelposis arborea (Peppervine) is reported as being semi-evergreen which means that it will not lose all its leaves in mild winters.  You should read the GROWING CONDITIONS on the species page for each one to determine which ones would do the best for your area.  You might consider trying several different vines to see which gives the best coverage and grows quickly.

Ampelopsis arborea (Peppervine) is fast-growing.  Our database says that it is deciduous to semi-evergreen.  Here is more information from the Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture site.

Ampelopsis cordata (Heartleaf peppervine) is also fast-growing.  Here is more information from the Texas A&M Aggie Horitculture site.

Vitis cinerea var. helleri (Winter grape) produces edible grapes.  Here are more photos and information from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Texas-Austin.

Vitis mustangensis (Mustang grape) produces grapes that wildlife (e.g., raccoons and opossums) enjoy.  For humans, however, they are not very palatable eaten off the vine, but will make a very delicious jelly and are often used in winemaking.  Here is more information from Texas A&M Aggie Horitculture and photos and information from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Texas-Austin.

Vitis monticola (Sweet mountain grape) produces edible grapes. Here is more information from Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture.

Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) is a vine that is found over much of the eastern US, but has been cultivated for its beautiful foliage and flowers.  It tolerates heat, cold and drought.  The USDA Plants Database distribution map shows that it has been reported as growing in San Saba.  Here is more information from the Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture site.

Clematis drummondii (Drummond's clematis)  Here is more information from the Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture site and photos from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Texas-Austin.

Cocculus carolinus (Carolina snailseed)  Here is more information from Missouri Botanical Gardens and from Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture.

Ibervillea lindheimeri (Lindheimer's globeberry)  Here are more photos and information from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

 Ipomoea cordatotriloba var. cordatotriloba (Tievine)  Here are more photos and information from the Houston Audubon Society.

Lonicera albiflora (Western white honeysuckle)  Here are photos and more information from Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Peppervine
Nekemias arborea

Heartleaf peppervine
Ampelopsis cordata

Winter grape
Vitis cinerea var. helleri

Mustang grape
Vitis mustangensis

Sweet mountain grape
Vitis monticola

Trumpet creeper
Campsis radicans

Old man's beard
Clematis drummondii

Carolina snailseed
Cocculus carolinus

Balsam gourd
Ibervillea lindheimeri

Tievine
Ipomoea cordatotriloba var. cordatotriloba

Western white honeysuckle
Lonicera albiflora

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