Open by reservation;
masks optional.

Open by reservation;
masks optional.

Luminations

A strollable winter tradition lighting up our Texas Arboretum

Luminations

A strollable winter tradition lighting up our Texas Arboretum

Welcome to the

BOTANIC GARDEN of TEXAS

A garden for everyone, open by reservation

EVENTS & CLASSES

Join us for one of our exciting classes, programs or events

Fortlandia logo

Luminations

Saturdays, Jan. 15 – 29, 2022

Pollinator Habitat garden

Series: Let's Care for Texas Plants!

Saturdays, Feb. 12 – 26, 2022

Fortlandia logo

Fortlandia

Oct. 2, 2021 – Jan. 30, 2022

Sprouts image

Story Time

Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 – 10:30 a.m.

Mon 31

Series: Yoga FIT

January 31 @ 11:00 am - 11:45 am
Feb 01

Series: Get FIT (SOLD OUT)

February 1 @ 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Feb 01

Series: Get FIT

February 1 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Feb 02

Series: Yoga FIT

February 2 @ 8:00 am - 8:45 am
Feb 02

Story Time

February 2 @ 10:00 am - 10:30 am

FIND A PLANT

Discover the Native Plants of North America


GARDEN VIEWS

An inside glimpse of the gardens from our Instagram feed

Looking for ways to winterize your garden? Try adding mulch about one inch from the base of new and established plants. This should help the soil retain moisture and generate heat to keep roots warm. More tips via link in bio.
ATTENTION EXPLORERS: Fortlandia ends soon! Come visit your favorite secret hideout one last time before this year's exhibition closes on Jan. 30, 2022. Details about Fortlandia (and Luminations, which also closes soon) are available via link in bio. 

📷 Critter Stack awaiting explorers, by Bill J. Boyd
Wildlife flock to possumhaw (Ilex decidua) like it’s the princess in a Disney film. Songbirds, game birds, possums, raccoons, squirrels and other critters love munching on the plant’s bright red berries, which look like candy — especially when adorned in ice! Resist the urge to try one yourself, though. Possumhaw berries are said to be poisonous to humans.
“Be a bush if you can’t be a tree. If you can’t be a highway, just be a trail. If you can’t be a sun, be a star. For it isn’t by size that you win or fail. Be the best of whatever you are.” 

- Martin Luther King Jr., in a 1967 speech addressed to the students of Barratt Junior High School in Philadelphia. 

📷 Gulf muhly (Muhlenbergia capillaris) at the Wildflower Center
We're open normal hours this holiday weekend. Explore Fortlandia during the day or get a ticket to one of our last Luminations nights of the season via link in bio. 

Trust us: there are few things more calming than strolling through our light-splashed Texas Arboretum with a cup of spiked hot chocolate! 

📸 Critter Stack during Luminations, by @alitexas
Despite common misconception, ball moss (Tillandsia recurvata) is not parasitic. In fact, it gets all the nutrients and water it needs from air! Learn more about this surprising plant and the research surrounding it via link in bio. 

Fun fact: Ball moss is part of the bromeliad family, which includes pineapples!
Pictured here is frostweed (Verbesina virginica), performing what some call its “magic trick.” When temperatures drop below freezing — as they did this morning in Austin — the plant pushes moisture out from its stem as ribbons of ice! Learn more about frostweed’s spellbinding ways via link in bio.

📸 Frostweed in the Family Garden by Amy Galloway
Despite its name, you won’t find coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus) under the sea. In fact, this native shrub grows best in well-drained sand, loam or clay soil. Add it to your woodland garden for bright pinkish-purple berries in the winter and whitish-green flowers in spring and early summer. 

Bonus: Coralberry provides food, cover and nesting sites for songbirds and other wildlife. 

📸 Lee Page
Need a vacation from your vacation? Strolling through our light-splashed Texas Arboretum while sipping hot chocolate (spiked upon request) should do the trick. Luminations continues through Jan. 30. Get your tickets via link in bio. 

📸 @alitexas
The Center is closed Friday, Dec. 31 and Saturday, Jan. 1. We look forward to seeing you in the new year!

📸 Heyder pincushion cactus (Mammillaria heyderi), glistening with rain water.
Looking for ways to winterize your garden? Try adding mulch about one inch from the base of new and established plants. This should help the soil retain moisture and generate heat to keep roots warm. More tips via link in bio.
ATTENTION EXPLORERS: Fortlandia ends soon! Come visit your favorite secret hideout one last time before this year's exhibition closes on Jan. 30, 2022. Details about Fortlandia (and Luminations, which also closes soon) are available via link in bio. 

📷 Critter Stack awaiting explorers, by Bill J. Boyd
Wildlife flock to possumhaw (Ilex decidua) like it’s the princess in a Disney film. Songbirds, game birds, possums, raccoons, squirrels and other critters love munching on the plant’s bright red berries, which look like candy — especially when adorned in ice! Resist the urge to try one yourself, though. Possumhaw berries are said to be poisonous to humans.
“Be a bush if you can’t be a tree. If you can’t be a highway, just be a trail. If you can’t be a sun, be a star. For it isn’t by size that you win or fail. Be the best of whatever you are.” 

- Martin Luther King Jr., in a 1967 speech addressed to the students of Barratt Junior High School in Philadelphia. 

📷 Gulf muhly (Muhlenbergia capillaris) at the Wildflower Center
We're open normal hours this holiday weekend. Explore Fortlandia during the day or get a ticket to one of our last Luminations nights of the season via link in bio. 

Trust us: there are few things more calming than strolling through our light-splashed Texas Arboretum with a cup of spiked hot chocolate! 

📸 Critter Stack during Luminations, by @alitexas
Despite common misconception, ball moss (Tillandsia recurvata) is not parasitic. In fact, it gets all the nutrients and water it needs from air! Learn more about this surprising plant and the research surrounding it via link in bio. 

Fun fact: Ball moss is part of the bromeliad family, which includes pineapples!
Pictured here is frostweed (Verbesina virginica), performing what some call its “magic trick.” When temperatures drop below freezing — as they did this morning in Austin — the plant pushes moisture out from its stem as ribbons of ice! Learn more about frostweed’s spellbinding ways via link in bio.

📸 Frostweed in the Family Garden by Amy Galloway
Despite its name, you won’t find coralberry (Symphoricarpos orbiculatus) under the sea. In fact, this native shrub grows best in well-drained sand, loam or clay soil. Add it to your woodland garden for bright pinkish-purple berries in the winter and whitish-green flowers in spring and early summer. 

Bonus: Coralberry provides food, cover and nesting sites for songbirds and other wildlife. 

📸 Lee Page
Need a vacation from your vacation? Strolling through our light-splashed Texas Arboretum while sipping hot chocolate (spiked upon request) should do the trick. Luminations continues through Jan. 30. Get your tickets via link in bio. 

📸 @alitexas
The Center is closed Friday, Dec. 31 and Saturday, Jan. 1. We look forward to seeing you in the new year!

📸 Heyder pincushion cactus (Mammillaria heyderi), glistening with rain water.

Help us spread the beauty!

EXPLORE MORE

Expert advice, plant nerdery and inspiring stories

Snow-on-the-prairie and a paper wasp; because it's a UVIVF image, the centers of the flowers stand out in blue against a plant that looks purple, and clumps of pollen shine bright white.

A Different Light

Creative photography helps us see flowers with new eyes

Illustration of compound leaves and round yellow flowers goldenball lead tree (Leucaena retusa)

Reflections and Reclamation

On Black Botanists Week and the power of representation
Big white bluestem prickly poppy blooms above purple blooms of prairie verbena along a concrete path.

Grounded

Time travel via tallgrass prairie