Open by reservation only. Masks required in all areas of the Wildflower Center.

Welcome to the

BOTANIC GARDEN of TEXAS

A garden for everyone, open by reservation with limited capacity

Questions? Call our hotline at 512.232.0101.
Read our safety guidelines.

EVENTS & CLASSES

Join us for one of our exciting online classes, programs or events

Fortlandia logo

The Science of Pollination

Saturday, Feb. 6

Sprouts image

Parent & Toddler Yoga

First & Third Tuesdays

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Yoga & Singing Bowls

Monthly, First Sundays
Feb 02

Parent & Toddler Yoga

February 2 @ 10:00 am - 10:30 am
Feb 06

The Science of Pollination- VIRTUAL – NEW!

February 6 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Feb 13

Wild Valentines Cards Workshop

February 13 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Feb 27

The Science of Native Plant Dyes – VIRTUAL

February 27 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Mar 03

Sprouts Story Time

March 3 @ 10:00 am - 10:45 am

FIND A PLANT

Discover the Native Plants of North America


GARDEN VIEWS

An inside glimpse of the gardens from our Instagram feed

This last Featured Fort Friday is… yours! As we’re fixing to say farewell to forts (#Fortlandia closes after Jan. 31), turn that frown upside down because Fort Build is open and explorable year-round in the Texas Arboretum. The large, shaded area is fortified with repurposed materials for nature play and endless building possibilities. Some of these “lose parts” include: bamboo (an invasive plant species), tree cookies (round slices of branches or trunks from when we need to remove or prune them), straw bales, pieces of former forts, and mulch, mulch more. Post your fort build photos in Stories & tag us — we’ll share them!  

📸: Josh Baker/ @azulox
The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a widespread and prolific thrush. Today, they flocked to the fields of our Texas Arboretum where the wet weather likely made for a protein-rich feast, as rain creates vibrations on the soil that bring earthworms to the surface. The oaks and other native plants at the Center support a diversity of birds, including robins that are likely to seek worms for breakfast and berries later in the day.  

📸 Bill J. Boyd 

Thanks to @cornellbirds for the Turdidae nutrition trivia

#AmericanRobin #BirdFacts #CallYourGirlfriend
...
once a snowflake fell
on my brow and i loved
it so much and i kissed
it and it was happy and called its cousins
and brothers and a web
of snow engulfed me then
i reached to love them all
and i squeezed them and they became
a spring rain and i stood perfectly
still and was a flower 

— Nikki Giovanni, Winter Poem
via @outdoorafro 

📸Four-nerve Daisy (Tetraneuris scaposa var. scaposa)
Going out? Don’t forget your hat...

Tell us how you’re enjoying this rare snow day in Central Texas! 

📸 Echinacea purpurea
This last Featured Fort Friday is… yours! As we’re fixing to say farewell to forts (#Fortlandia closes after Jan. 31), turn that frown upside down because Fort Build is open and explorable year-round in the Texas Arboretum. The large, shaded area is fortified with repurposed materials for nature play and endless building possibilities. Some of these “lose parts” include: bamboo (an invasive plant species), tree cookies (round slices of branches or trunks from when we need to remove or prune them), straw bales, pieces of former forts, and mulch, mulch more. Post your fort build photos in Stories & tag us — we’ll share them!  

📸: Josh Baker/ @azulox
The American robin (Turdus migratorius) is a widespread and prolific thrush. Today, they flocked to the fields of our Texas Arboretum where the wet weather likely made for a protein-rich feast, as rain creates vibrations on the soil that bring earthworms to the surface. The oaks and other native plants at the Center support a diversity of birds, including robins that are likely to seek worms for breakfast and berries later in the day.  

📸 Bill J. Boyd 

Thanks to @cornellbirds for the Turdidae nutrition trivia

#AmericanRobin #BirdFacts #CallYourGirlfriend
...
once a snowflake fell
on my brow and i loved
it so much and i kissed
it and it was happy and called its cousins
and brothers and a web
of snow engulfed me then
i reached to love them all
and i squeezed them and they became
a spring rain and i stood perfectly
still and was a flower 

— Nikki Giovanni, Winter Poem
via @outdoorafro 

📸Four-nerve Daisy (Tetraneuris scaposa var. scaposa)
Going out? Don’t forget your hat...

Tell us how you’re enjoying this rare snow day in Central Texas! 

📸 Echinacea purpurea

Help us spread the beauty!

EXPLORE MORE

Expert advice, plant nerdery and inspiring stories

Monarch on mistflower

Pull It or Plant It: Inland Sea Oats

Winter is one of the most subtly beautiful times to visit

monarch on goldenrod

Bloom, Set, Match

What draws certain pollinators to particular plants
Monarch on mistflower

A Natural Calling

Native plants in mosaic habitats bring birds to the Mission Reach