Space is limited. Reservations encouraged.

Welcome to the

BOTANIC GARDEN of TEXAS

EVENTS & CLASSES

Join us for one of our exciting classes, programs or events

Series: Botanical Illustration

July 21 – Sept. 1, 2022

Fortlandia logo

Fortlandia

Oct. 8, 2022 – Jan. 29, 2023

FIND A PLANT

Discover the Native Plants of North America


GARDEN VIEWS

An inside glimpse of the gardens from our Instagram feed

There's no better time to support the Wildflower Center. We're gearing up for a fall full of environmental research and engaging educational programs. Give today and your gift will be DOUBLED by a $50,000 matching fund for twice the impact. Learn more and donate via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Pink evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa)

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Can you blame this spider for setting up shop beneath the pale pink petals of a saltmarsh mallow (Kosteletzkya virginica)? If you’re going to spend hours waiting for a fly to land in your web, you might as well do it somewhere beautiful! 

Plan your Wildflower Center visit via link in bio. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Leggy, awkward, unremarkable — but with an understated beauty you only notice once you get to know them. Think we’re talking about the protagonist in an up-and-coming young adult drama? Nope. Velvetweed (Oenothera curtiflora) fits this bill too. 

An annually blooming member of the evening primrose family, it might be easy to miss in an overgrown patch, but once you take a moment to appreciate its delicate, blush-colored flowers and fuzzy stems and leaves, there truly is much to love.

Look for velvetweed on your next Wildflower Center visit! Plan your trip via link in bio. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
American snout butterflies (Libytheana carinenta) may look like winged Pinocchios, but their “noses” are actually elongated mouthparts. The two pictured here are lounging on the seed pods of a native trumpet vine (Campsis radicans) in our gardens. Plan your Wildflower Center visit via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Katherine Daniels (@naturewalker1)

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
What does a Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana) taste like? “Kind of earthy,” according to Susan Jackson, former manager of Wildflower Café, like a blueberry crossed with a fig. We first published Jackson’s persimmon dessert bar recipe in a 2015 edition of our member magazine. View it now (while the persimmons are ripe) via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Sally and Andy Wasowski

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Installation is well underway for Field of Light, @brucemunrostudio’s stunning display of 28,000 solar-powered, fiber-optic light pods. The experiential exhibition opens Sept. 9 in our Texas Arboretum. Get tickets now via link in bio! 

See video transcript in comments. 

#FieldOfLightAustin #LadyBirdWildflowers #BruceMunroLight #StayWild
Some say frogfruit (Phyla nodiflora) resembles frog eyes. You’ll definitely want to have a staring contest with this adorable native plant, which produces blooms all summer long and attracts butterflies and bees galore! For more reasons to love frogfruit, watch this video featuring Leslie Uppinghouse, Wildflower Center horticulturist. (See transcript in comments.) 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
“I give so the Center can teach others the importance of sustainability through its programs and presence.” - David Yeomans, Chief Meteorologist, @kxan_news

Your support is crucial as the Wildflower Center works diligently to inspire the conservation of native plants and improve our environment. Join David in his commitment to building a more resilient future. Give today and help us reach our fundraising goal of $100,000 by August 31, 2022. The impact of your gift will be doubled by our $50,000 matching fund. Donate now via link in bio. 
 
PHOTO: @davidyeomansweather

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
There’s a newly dedicated tree in our Texas Arboretum, thanks to the Top Ladies of Distinction, Dale City - Prince William County Chapter! Formed in 1964 after Major Ozell M. Dean attended a luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc. (TLOD) shares our founder’s commitment to environmental equity. In addition to community beautification projects, the humanitarian organization focuses on improving the lives of youth, women and senior citizens. 

Last week, TLOD members from across the country visited the Center for the tree dedication ceremony, which included poetry readings and remembrances. Look for TLOD’s Texas red oak (Quercus buckleyi) next time you’re in the Arboretum! 

PHOTO: Members of @tlodinc1964 and @dcpwc_tlod with Wildflower Center staff 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Growing milkweeds (Asclepias sp.) is one of the best ways to support monarch butterflies. Yes, these plants are notoriously difficult to germinate, but don’t despair! We’ve developed and tested a protocol that results in good germination rates for a number of native milkweed species. See link in bio for a step-by-step guide. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
There's no better time to support the Wildflower Center. We're gearing up for a fall full of environmental research and engaging educational programs. Give today and your gift will be DOUBLED by a $50,000 matching fund for twice the impact. Learn more and donate via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Pink evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa)

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Can you blame this spider for setting up shop beneath the pale pink petals of a saltmarsh mallow (Kosteletzkya virginica)? If you’re going to spend hours waiting for a fly to land in your web, you might as well do it somewhere beautiful! 

Plan your Wildflower Center visit via link in bio. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Leggy, awkward, unremarkable — but with an understated beauty you only notice once you get to know them. Think we’re talking about the protagonist in an up-and-coming young adult drama? Nope. Velvetweed (Oenothera curtiflora) fits this bill too. 

An annually blooming member of the evening primrose family, it might be easy to miss in an overgrown patch, but once you take a moment to appreciate its delicate, blush-colored flowers and fuzzy stems and leaves, there truly is much to love.

Look for velvetweed on your next Wildflower Center visit! Plan your trip via link in bio. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
American snout butterflies (Libytheana carinenta) may look like winged Pinocchios, but their “noses” are actually elongated mouthparts. The two pictured here are lounging on the seed pods of a native trumpet vine (Campsis radicans) in our gardens. Plan your Wildflower Center visit via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Katherine Daniels (@naturewalker1)

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
What does a Texas persimmon (Diospyros texana) taste like? “Kind of earthy,” according to Susan Jackson, former manager of Wildflower Café, like a blueberry crossed with a fig. We first published Jackson’s persimmon dessert bar recipe in a 2015 edition of our member magazine. View it now (while the persimmons are ripe) via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Sally and Andy Wasowski

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Installation is well underway for Field of Light, @brucemunrostudio’s stunning display of 28,000 solar-powered, fiber-optic light pods. The experiential exhibition opens Sept. 9 in our Texas Arboretum. Get tickets now via link in bio! 

See video transcript in comments. 

#FieldOfLightAustin #LadyBirdWildflowers #BruceMunroLight #StayWild
Some say frogfruit (Phyla nodiflora) resembles frog eyes. You’ll definitely want to have a staring contest with this adorable native plant, which produces blooms all summer long and attracts butterflies and bees galore! For more reasons to love frogfruit, watch this video featuring Leslie Uppinghouse, Wildflower Center horticulturist. (See transcript in comments.) 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
“I give so the Center can teach others the importance of sustainability through its programs and presence.” - David Yeomans, Chief Meteorologist, @kxan_news

Your support is crucial as the Wildflower Center works diligently to inspire the conservation of native plants and improve our environment. Join David in his commitment to building a more resilient future. Give today and help us reach our fundraising goal of $100,000 by August 31, 2022. The impact of your gift will be doubled by our $50,000 matching fund. Donate now via link in bio. 
 
PHOTO: @davidyeomansweather

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
There’s a newly dedicated tree in our Texas Arboretum, thanks to the Top Ladies of Distinction, Dale City - Prince William County Chapter! Formed in 1964 after Major Ozell M. Dean attended a luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Top Ladies of Distinction, Inc. (TLOD) shares our founder’s commitment to environmental equity. In addition to community beautification projects, the humanitarian organization focuses on improving the lives of youth, women and senior citizens. 

Last week, TLOD members from across the country visited the Center for the tree dedication ceremony, which included poetry readings and remembrances. Look for TLOD’s Texas red oak (Quercus buckleyi) next time you’re in the Arboretum! 

PHOTO: Members of @tlodinc1964 and @dcpwc_tlod with Wildflower Center staff 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild
Growing milkweeds (Asclepias sp.) is one of the best ways to support monarch butterflies. Yes, these plants are notoriously difficult to germinate, but don’t despair! We’ve developed and tested a protocol that results in good germination rates for a number of native milkweed species. See link in bio for a step-by-step guide. 

#LadyBirdWildflowers #StayWild

Help us spread the beauty!

EXPLORE MORE

Expert advice, plant nerdery and inspiring stories

Snow-on-the-prairie and a paper wasp; because it's a UVIVF image, the centers of the flowers stand out in blue against a plant that looks purple, and clumps of pollen shine bright white.

A Different Light

Creative photography helps us see flowers with new eyes

Illustration of compound leaves and round yellow flowers goldenball lead tree (Leucaena retusa)

Reflections and Reclamation

On Black Botanists Week and the power of representation
Big white bluestem prickly poppy blooms above purple blooms of prairie verbena along a concrete path.

Grounded

Time travel via tallgrass prairie