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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - February 21, 2010

From: Dallas, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Privacy hedge for Dallas area
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We live in the Park Cities area of Dallas, and our neighbors are right on top of us. Our lot is small, but I'm looking for a privacy hedge or small tree to plant along the side of the fence. It needs to grow about 10 feet tall, be very hardy and not be too wide, as our backyard is small. Do you have any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants assumes that you are interested in evergreen shrubs for your hedge.  Here are some suggestions that are generallly within your size range.  As they grow wider, they can be judiciously pruned to keep them from encroaching on your yard space.

Morella cerifera [syn. = Myrica cerifera] (wax myrtle) and here is more information.  There are dwarf varieties of this shrub that only grow to 3-4 feet so you would need to be certain that you aren't buying one of those.

Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas barometer bush) and here is more information

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon) and here is more information.

Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita) and here is more information.

Rhus virens (evergreen sumac) and here is more information.

Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain-laurel) and here is more information.

There are three evergreen vines that you might consider growing on your fence:

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle) and here is more information.

Gelsemium sempervirens (evening trumpetflower) and here is more information.

Bignonia capreolata (crossvine) and here is more information.


Morella cerifera

Leucophyllum frutescens

Ilex vomitoria

Mahonia trifoliolata

Rhus virens

Sophora secundiflora

Lonicera sempervirens

Gelsemium sempervirens

Bignonia capreolata

 

 

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