Welcome to the

BOTANIC GARDEN of TEXAS

A garden for everyone, open by reservation

Dog Days

It’s time for trails + tails with your canine bestie!

Dog Days

It’s time for trails + tails with your canine bestie!

EVENTS & CLASSES

Join us for one of our exciting classes, programs or events

FIND A PLANT

Discover the Native Plants of North America


GARDEN VIEWS

An inside glimpse of the gardens from our Instagram feed

The dog days of summer are here — in more ways than one! This weekend (July 31 & Aug. 1) we're inviting pups to explore our trails with their humans. Review the rules and reserve a spot for you and your pooch via link in bio.
It’s #BlackBotanistsWeek and we’re thrilled to have an essay by Dr. Beronda L. Montgomery, one of the movement's founders, in our next issue of Wildflower magazine. Here's an excerpt: 

“Although I may be the first formally educated botanist in the family, I am certainly not a first-generation Black botanist. With her keen ability to ‘listen’ to her plants, to identify and respond to their needs, my mom was certainly a botanist before me. And, given the many botanists who were certainly among my enslaved ancestors, I’m not likely a second-generation Black botanist either. Among them were those whose expertise in cultivating rice and other crops led to them being highly valued as property, even as their enslavement was an abhorrent moral devaluation. Reflection on this reality reminds me my success is a reclamation of sorts of our ancestral botanical legacy.” 

Wildflower magazine is free for members. For more information on #BlackBotanistsWeek, see link in bio. 

📸  Portrait of @beronda_m by Blythe White
We're offering free admission TODAY (July 24) in honor of our visionary founder, Lady Bird Johnson! Reserve your complimentary Lady Bird Day ticket via link in bio. 
#BeLikeLadyBird 

📸  Mrs. Johnson in 1994 at the construction site of our current location. She wanted the facility to feel like a natural part of the environment and inspired the architects @overlandpartners to think green. The results were revolutionary, establishing the Wildflower Center as a national leader in sustainable construction. #BeLikeLadyBird
Nature is all about relationships. Consider, for instance, how a butterfly pollinates a plant by sipping its nectar. You and the Wildflower Center represent another reciprocal pairing. And right now, we need your help. 

To offset the unprecedented challenges of the past 16 months, we're working hard to raise $100,000 by Aug. 27, 2021. Please consider making a contribution today. Your gift will be automatically doubled by our $50,000 matching fund, resulting in twice the impact. 

Every dollar helps ensure the Center can continue to inspire the conservation of native plants and provide a place of respite when it’s needed most. Ready to help? Follow the link in our bio to donate.
In the summer of 1968, President Johnson gave his wife 50 pens. Each had been used to sign a different environmental bill into law. The pens were accompanied by a plaque that read: "To Lady Bird, who has inspired me and millions of Americans to try to preserve our land and beautify our nation. With love from Lyndon." More than 200 environmental laws were passed during the Johnson administration, many of which are credited to Mrs. Johnson's work.

Lady Bird Day is happening this Saturday, July 24. Come celebrate our founder's environmental legacy with free admission and family-friendly activities. Reserve your spot via link in bio.

📸 Courtesy of @lbjlibrarynow

#BeLikeLadyBird
Pictured here is the Arboretum Trail, but let’s pretend it’s your career path! We have openings for the following positions on our Wildflower Center team: 

- Arborist/Forestry Specialist (Full Time) 
- Assistant Development Director (Full Time) 
- Guest Experience Associate (Part Time, Multiple Openings) 
- Venue Coordinator (Full Time) 

For job descriptions and application instructions, see link in bio. (Don’t forget to tag friends who may be interested!)
If you stumble upon a blooming dayflower (Commelina erecta), enjoy it while you can! As the name suggests, this flower’s dainty blue petals — which some say look like Mickey Mouse ears — disappear after just one day. Luckily, each plant contains multiple buds that graciously unfold from May through October. They’re showing up left and right this month. Have you spotted any recently? 

📸  Joseph Marcus
Looking for some dinner inspiration? Mrs. Johnson’s King Ranch Casserole seems simple enough for a weeknight. This recipe and many others are part of @lbjlibrarynow's online collection (link in bio).

Check back next Monday for more Mrs. Johnson tidbits as we gear up for Lady Bird Day on July 24. This annual celebration of our founder’s environmental legacy is FREE to the public. Ticket reservations open one week before the event. #BeLikeLadyBird
Why are there so many sunflowers this year? Minnette Marr, the Wildflower Center’s conservation botanist and research associate, has a few theories. She recently shared them all with @mysanantonio. Read the article via link in bio (and then sign up for Minnette’s online sunflower class, July 17!)

📸  Common sunflower (Helianthus annuus) by Al Braden

#WildflowerOfTheYear #WOTY
The dog days of summer are here — in more ways than one! This weekend (July 31 & Aug. 1) we're inviting pups to explore our trails with their humans. Review the rules and reserve a spot for you and your pooch via link in bio.
It’s #BlackBotanistsWeek and we’re thrilled to have an essay by Dr. Beronda L. Montgomery, one of the movement's founders, in our next issue of Wildflower magazine. Here's an excerpt: 

“Although I may be the first formally educated botanist in the family, I am certainly not a first-generation Black botanist. With her keen ability to ‘listen’ to her plants, to identify and respond to their needs, my mom was certainly a botanist before me. And, given the many botanists who were certainly among my enslaved ancestors, I’m not likely a second-generation Black botanist either. Among them were those whose expertise in cultivating rice and other crops led to them being highly valued as property, even as their enslavement was an abhorrent moral devaluation. Reflection on this reality reminds me my success is a reclamation of sorts of our ancestral botanical legacy.” 

Wildflower magazine is free for members. For more information on #BlackBotanistsWeek, see link in bio. 

📸  Portrait of @beronda_m by Blythe White
We're offering free admission TODAY (July 24) in honor of our visionary founder, Lady Bird Johnson! Reserve your complimentary Lady Bird Day ticket via link in bio. 
#BeLikeLadyBird 

📸  Mrs. Johnson in 1994 at the construction site of our current location. She wanted the facility to feel like a natural part of the environment and inspired the architects @overlandpartners to think green. The results were revolutionary, establishing the Wildflower Center as a national leader in sustainable construction. #BeLikeLadyBird
Nature is all about relationships. Consider, for instance, how a butterfly pollinates a plant by sipping its nectar. You and the Wildflower Center represent another reciprocal pairing. And right now, we need your help. 

To offset the unprecedented challenges of the past 16 months, we're working hard to raise $100,000 by Aug. 27, 2021. Please consider making a contribution today. Your gift will be automatically doubled by our $50,000 matching fund, resulting in twice the impact. 

Every dollar helps ensure the Center can continue to inspire the conservation of native plants and provide a place of respite when it’s needed most. Ready to help? Follow the link in our bio to donate.
In the summer of 1968, President Johnson gave his wife 50 pens. Each had been used to sign a different environmental bill into law. The pens were accompanied by a plaque that read: "To Lady Bird, who has inspired me and millions of Americans to try to preserve our land and beautify our nation. With love from Lyndon." More than 200 environmental laws were passed during the Johnson administration, many of which are credited to Mrs. Johnson's work.

Lady Bird Day is happening this Saturday, July 24. Come celebrate our founder's environmental legacy with free admission and family-friendly activities. Reserve your spot via link in bio.

📸 Courtesy of @lbjlibrarynow

#BeLikeLadyBird
Pictured here is the Arboretum Trail, but let’s pretend it’s your career path! We have openings for the following positions on our Wildflower Center team: 

- Arborist/Forestry Specialist (Full Time) 
- Assistant Development Director (Full Time) 
- Guest Experience Associate (Part Time, Multiple Openings) 
- Venue Coordinator (Full Time) 

For job descriptions and application instructions, see link in bio. (Don’t forget to tag friends who may be interested!)
If you stumble upon a blooming dayflower (Commelina erecta), enjoy it while you can! As the name suggests, this flower’s dainty blue petals — which some say look like Mickey Mouse ears — disappear after just one day. Luckily, each plant contains multiple buds that graciously unfold from May through October. They’re showing up left and right this month. Have you spotted any recently? 

📸  Joseph Marcus
Looking for some dinner inspiration? Mrs. Johnson’s King Ranch Casserole seems simple enough for a weeknight. This recipe and many others are part of @lbjlibrarynow's online collection (link in bio).

Check back next Monday for more Mrs. Johnson tidbits as we gear up for Lady Bird Day on July 24. This annual celebration of our founder’s environmental legacy is FREE to the public. Ticket reservations open one week before the event. #BeLikeLadyBird
Why are there so many sunflowers this year? Minnette Marr, the Wildflower Center’s conservation botanist and research associate, has a few theories. She recently shared them all with @mysanantonio. Read the article via link in bio (and then sign up for Minnette’s online sunflower class, July 17!)

📸  Common sunflower (Helianthus annuus) by Al Braden

#WildflowerOfTheYear #WOTY

Help us spread the beauty!

EXPLORE MORE

Expert advice, plant nerdery and inspiring stories

A close-up of a tree cross section in grayscale clearly shows tree rings and some cracks and wear

Reading the Rings

What tree rings can teach us about history, climate and future

Maximilian sunflower, Helianthus maximiliani

For the Love of Sunflowers

Why our Wildflower of the Year is a native garden must-have

In a pair of black-and-white photos, two mature Black women stand in their yards; the woman on the left has a natural broom and wears mostly white, including a hat; the woman on the right wears a dotted dress and stands in front of a wall of containers.

The Influencers

Acknowledging the impact of Black women on American horticulture