En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - November 04, 2011

From: Miami, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification, Vines
Title: Vine with red berries in North Carolina
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I found a plant/ vine pink teardrop with red berries in the Pusgah Forest in North Carolina and no on knows the name of it. I have a photo, can you help?

ANSWER:

A little more information about the plant would be helpful, e.g., size, leaf-type, does pink teardrop describe the flower?   You can see information about native vines in North Carolina by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database, choosing North Carolina under Select State or Province and "Vine" under Habit (general appearance).  There are more than 70 vines native to North Carolina on our database.   Of those, here are ones that have red berries:

Celastrus scandens (American bittersweet).  Here are more photos and information.

Cocculus carolinus (Carolina snailseed)

Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina jessamine)

Smilax smallii (Lanceleaf greenbrier) and here are more photos and information.

And, here are a few vines with pinkish flowers that are somewhat teardrop shaped:

Polygonum arifolium (Halberdleaf tearthumb) and here are photos and more information.

Polygonum cilinode (Fringed black bindweed) and here are photos and more information.

Polygonum sagittatum (Arrowleaf tearthumb) and here are photos and more information.

Polygonum scandens (Climbing false buckwheat) and here are photos and more information.

Of course, your plant may not be a vine, in which case you could do a similar COMBINATION SEARCH and choosing "Shrub" or "Subshrub" under Habit (general appearance).  It is also possible that your plant is not a native plant, in which case it wouldn't be in our Native Plant Database and we are not likely to know what it is.  

If you didn't find your plant in any of the above, please visit our Plant Identification page where you will find links to several plant identification forums that accept photos for identification.

 

From the Image Gallery


American bittersweet
Celastrus scandens

Carolina snailseed
Cocculus carolinus

Carolina jessamine
Gelsemium sempervirens

Lanceleaf greenbrier
Smilax smallii

Climbing false buckwheat
Polygonum scandens

More Plant Identification Questions

Plant identification
July 31, 2010 - I have this shrub looking type plant with leaves that smell like lemons. The plant has a very small white flower on it. This shrub shows up in my yard every year in the summer. We are curious as to we...
view the full question and answer

Mystery shrub in Michigan
July 18, 2011 - I live in the upper peninsula of Michigan and noticed a shrub in the woods that has large clusters of small red, what I would call berries on it. Can you give me some n...
view the full question and answer

Identity of small "Pitcher" plants growing in backyard
July 25, 2013 - I have small pitcher plants growing in the grass in my backyard. Looks like very dark cobra. Come every summer when very hot. They are about 4 or 5 inches from base to tip of hood. I have a pic. le...
view the full question and answer

Plant identification
August 26, 2011 - I have found a small tree like plant that is small and the stem or trunk was thin and the leaves look like fern leaves. I also found a larger one it was thicker and closer to the ground the leaves wer...
view the full question and answer

Plant identification
October 06, 2009 - We have a large bush type plant, about 4 feet tall, fragant voilet flowers, large dark green leaves and spiney seed pods (about the size of golf balls) that have many seeds inside. They started growi...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center