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Tuesday - April 16, 2013

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pruning, Shrubs, Trees, Vines
Title: Climbing options for a Coral honeysuckle in Austin Texas
Answered by: Leslie Uppinghouse


Regarding Coral honeysuckle, what is the best support to encourage continued spread, chicken-wire/fencing? Currently the plants and vines are on fencing and beginning to fold over. I'd like to add chicken-wire above the fencing if that's appropriate.


Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle) is an easy vine to please. In nature this cheery plant would grow into the trees as a vine, or on the ground as a mounding shrub. You might also find it in the wild as a meandering ground cover. It chooses its own path so if this plant has climbed successfully up your fence then yes, you can add to that fence and it should continue to climb. However if you don't want a higher fence then it is fine for the vine to fold over and start to spread out back onto itself. 

If you do choose to add the chicken-wire fencing to the top of your existing fence then you may need to weave a few strands into the holes to get it going. Chicken-wire is a good option but has small holes. The honeysuckle will take the easiest route so if the ground is easier than up and through the tiny holes then it will continue to fold over and go down. To convince this plant to travel up, just take a couple of young sprigs and weave them into the chicken-wire. Be careful not to weave it too tight. It is important that you make sure the tips of the vines are woven into the holes.

Also keep in mind you can prune a Coral honeysuckle. If you like the height of your fence or if you add to your fence and the vine out climbs that addition, just trim back the vine. They respond well to pruning and it helps keep them thick and fluffy so don't be afraid to keep your Coral honeysuckle in check.


From the Image Gallery

Coral honeysuckle
Lonicera sempervirens

Coral honeysuckle
Lonicera sempervirens

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