En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - September 14, 2012

From: Kempner, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Propagation, Transplants, Watering, Trees
Title: Dying branches on Texas Mountain Laurel from Kempner TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

The branches on my Texas Mountain Laurel are very dry and brittle. The leaves are also starting to die. The tree has been in my yard for six years and prior to that it sat wrapped in burlap for over three years at my fathers home. It bloomed beautifully this past spring. The growth at the top of the tree is still green and when i do the scratch test the higher limbs are okay. It's the lower, thick limbs that are brittle and break very easily. The tree is over 15 ft tall and the tree was originally in Kerrville, Tx. I've also noticed a lot of dead branches on the tree as well. I live in Kempner, Tx with very rocky soil. Because of the problems digging a deep enough hole to plant the tree, we planted the tree above ground and built a stone 2" ft landscape wall around the tree and added soil to cover the root ball of the tree. Since the branches are so brittle, I'm thinking it is not getting enough waterm but we run our sprinkler system every day. I hope it's not too late to save my tree, but I don't know what to do. I hope you can help.

ANSWER:

Okay, let us see if we understand the lifespan so far of your Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel)

1. It was originally dug up, in the wild, perhaps? in Kerrville, TX. From our webpage on Propagation of this tree:

"Since S. secundiflora is a slow growing plant, most specimen sized shrubs are made commercially available by digging them from the wild, and then balling and burlapping. It is difficult for S. secundiflora to survive this kind of transplant because it has a sparse root system with a deep taproot. Because it is impossible to dig up the entire root, the plant often goes into shock and dies."

2. Second transplant: For three years, it sat wrapped in burlap in your father's home. Also in Central Texas?

3. Third transplant: moved to your yard in Lampasas County, where it stayed for 6 years, in a raised bed, with daily sprinkling.

From the Growing Conditions on our webpage for this plant:

"Conditions Comments: Needs good drainage"

This plant should get a medal (or perhaps a nice tombstone) for survival. Every suggestion we make to gardeners wishing to have a Texas Mountain Laurel has been defied. Three years without access to fresh soil and water! Three transplants of a plant that severely dislikes transplants. Six years in different soil with constant daily watering. This plant is basically a desert plant and needs deep watering maybe twice a month. Daily sprinkling of anything wastes water in this part of the country that can't afford it, and can cause fungal disease in the plants.

So, although we may not have hit on the precise thing that is killing your plant, at least you have several to choose from.

Can it be saved? We get many questions on Texas Mountain Laurel, including pruning. You might as well try it, what can you lose? Here are some previous questions on  Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel); they have other useful links.

# 7765

Lopidea

Aphids

Mountain Laurels dying in Georgetown

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

More Transplants Questions

Non-blooming climbing rose in Conroe, TX
October 09, 2009 - I have a climbing rose and it has never bloomed and has no thorns, it was a cutting from another rose bush. I have given it water and fertilize and have mulch around it also.
view the full question and answer

Removal of pups from Century Plant after blooming in Prairieville LA
October 03, 2009 - Will the main part of the century plant always die after it grows a stalk? I have babies coming off the base and need to know if I should separate them to keep them alive.
view the full question and answer

Living fence of native plants for Ojai, CA
September 20, 2008 - I would like to build a "green fence" about 10-15 feet tall. I live in Ojai, CA where we have VERY hot summers and it goes below freezing every winter. The soil does not seem to drain well..it is e...
view the full question and answer

Decline of non-native Star Jasmine in California
June 30, 2008 - We just had 2 trachelospermum jasminoides planted in a redwood planter box about a month ago. We can't figure out if we are watering too much or too little but some leaves are turning yellow and the...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting adventitious shoots of a mountain laurel in San Antonio
August 20, 2009 - Is it possible to transplant branches (shoots) growing from a mountain laurel that was chopped down? Some are two years old and several feet tall (but not yet blooming) and some as small as a foot. ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center