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Tuesday - November 08, 2011

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Native evergreen to replace non-native chinaberry
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Looking for a native evergreen tree to replace a fruitless Chinaberry that was 35 years old. We have clay soil for about 3 feet and then you hit rock. Suggestions would be appreciated.

ANSWER:

Here are several small to medium evergreen trees that grow well in Austin's soils and climate:

Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain laurel) has beautiful purple flowers in the spring and usually grows to 10 or 15 feet.

Prunus caroliniana (Cherry laurel) grows moderately fast and reaches a height of 15 to 30 feet.

Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon) produces red berries (on the female trees) for wildlife and grows 10 to 25 feet high.

Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar) usually grows to 30  or 40 feet, but can grow higher.

Ehretia anacua (Anacua) grows 20-45 feet high.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Cherry laurel
Prunus caroliniana

Cherry laurel
Prunus caroliniana

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

Yaupon
Ilex vomitoria

Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Anacua
Ehretia anacua

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