En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Trees for barrier fence near swimming pool in West Virginia

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - March 10, 2010

From: Morgantown, WV
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees for barrier fence near swimming pool in West Virginia
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Near swimming pool, barrier fence needs to replace pine trees. Prefer blooming perennial at least 12' high,low sun exposure, minimal pruning.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants suggests the following small trees/large shrubs for your barrier fence.  All are West Virginia natives and will grow in shade (less than 2 hours of sun per day) and/or partial shade (2 to 6 hours of sun per day):

Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel), an evergreen

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle), evergreen

Rhododendron catawbiense (Catawba rosebay), evergreen

Rhododendron maximum (great laurel), evergreen

Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay), semi-evergreen to evergreen

Cornus alternifolia (alternateleaf dogwood)

Viburnum prunifolium (blackhaw)

Amelanchier canadensis (Canadian serviceberry)

Asimina triloba (pawpaw)

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud)

Chionanthus virginicus (white fringetree)

Cornus florida (flowering dogwood)

Prunus americana (American plum)

Sorbus americana (American mountain ash)

Viburnum rufidulum (rusty blackhaw)

You can see other possibilities by checking out the West Virginia Recommended list.  You can NARROW YOUR SEARCH by selecting "Trees" or "Shrubs" from the GENERAL APPEARANCE category.

Here are photos of the above from our Image Gallery:


Kalmia latifolia

Morella cerifera

Rhododendron catawbiense

Rhododendron maximum

Magnolia virginiana

Cornus alternifolia

Viburnum prunifolium

Amelanchier canadensis

Asimina triloba

Cercis canadensis

Chionanthus virginicus

Cornus florida

Prunus americana

Sorbus americana

Viburnum rufidulum

 


 

 

 

More Trees Questions

California plants poisonous to dogs from Sacramento
July 01, 2012 - Found dodonea viscosa purple. Is it poisonous to dogs? Also Gold Star Potentilla. Going drought tolerant and need small trees, shrubs and plants not poisonous to dogs for sun and partial sun.
view the full question and answer

Wildflowers that grow in woodlands
June 22, 2011 - Please tell me the names of wildflowers that grow under your oak trees in Texas. I am only familiar with those open meadow plants, not those that live under the deciduous trees. Thank you for your t...
view the full question and answer

Need help diagnosing a problem with Bur Oak in Plano, TX
April 28, 2010 - I planted a bur oak 8 or 9 years ago. It has grown beautifully until this year. When opening, the leaves are very small (a couple inches) and there are lots of seeds (catkins?). I would hate to los...
view the full question and answer

Why didn't the mountain laurels bloom this year in Georgetown, TX?
June 19, 2014 - Why are the mountain laurels not blooming this year, I live in Georgetown, TX?
view the full question and answer

Live oak sprouts in Austin
August 01, 2010 - How can I control the hundreds of live oak sprouts our lovely trees are throwing off? We recently landscaped with rain gardens and the related drainage ditches; they are filled with these very happy ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center