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Wednesday - March 10, 2010

From: Morgantown, WV
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees for barrier fence near swimming pool in West Virginia
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Near swimming pool, barrier fence needs to replace pine trees. Prefer blooming perennial at least 12' high,low sun exposure, minimal pruning.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants suggests the following small trees/large shrubs for your barrier fence.  All are West Virginia natives and will grow in shade (less than 2 hours of sun per day) and/or partial shade (2 to 6 hours of sun per day):

Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel), an evergreen

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle), evergreen

Rhododendron catawbiense (Catawba rosebay), evergreen

Rhododendron maximum (great laurel), evergreen

Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay), semi-evergreen to evergreen

Cornus alternifolia (alternateleaf dogwood)

Viburnum prunifolium (blackhaw)

Amelanchier canadensis (Canadian serviceberry)

Asimina triloba (pawpaw)

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud)

Chionanthus virginicus (white fringetree)

Cornus florida (flowering dogwood)

Prunus americana (American plum)

Sorbus americana (American mountain ash)

Viburnum rufidulum (rusty blackhaw)

You can see other possibilities by checking out the West Virginia Recommended list.  You can NARROW YOUR SEARCH by selecting "Trees" or "Shrubs" from the GENERAL APPEARANCE category.

Here are photos of the above from our Image Gallery:


Kalmia latifolia

Morella cerifera

Rhododendron catawbiense

Rhododendron maximum

Magnolia virginiana

Cornus alternifolia

Viburnum prunifolium

Amelanchier canadensis

Asimina triloba

Cercis canadensis

Chionanthus virginicus

Cornus florida

Prunus americana

Sorbus americana

Viburnum rufidulum

 


 

 

 

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