En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - August 20, 2007

From: Marble Falls, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Waht are the truly native Texas trees
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What two trees are truly native to Texas? I was told pecan and can't remember the other.

ANSWER:

According to the accepted practice, any North American plant that was present before the Europeans came to the continent is considered to be a native. The same would apply to Texas native trees. Perhaps you were referring to nut trees only? In that case, from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Plant Database, we learned that Juglans nigra (black walnut), Carya texana (black hickory), and Carya illinoinensis (pecan) are all nut trees native to Texas, which makes three. Then we started looking at the same Database for trees that were considered native to Texas. We found 30 trees, including the above-named nuts, three elms, four oaks, another walnut, two pines and many others that are familiar to students of Texas native trees. If you were asking about two trees native exclusively to Texas, we found two oaks, Quercus buckleyii and Q. graciliformis, but no pecans.

We're sorry we couldn't answer the question about "which is the other truly native Texas tree?" Maybe there is another qualifier to that question that we don't know about. If so, let us know, and we'll take another crack at it.

 

More Trees Questions

Freeze-resistant palms for Central Texas
November 09, 2012 - I live in Lytton Springs just north of Lockhart. What is a good hardy palm that I can get that will grow without the worry of freeze?
view the full question and answer

Root ball disintegrating on Arroyo sweetwood from Dripping Springs TX
May 11, 2013 - I just purchased a arroyo sweetwood in a 5 gallon container and when I went to put it in the ground the root ball completely fell apart. I put it in the ground and watered it really good. What are its...
view the full question and answer

Pacific dogwood not fruiting
September 30, 2009 - We have a beautiful Pacific Dogwood in front of our balcony. In some years it has fruit (berries) but has not for the past two years. When it does, it becomes a magnet for Northern Flickers. Is the pr...
view the full question and answer

Striped caterpillars on Cornus sericea (redtwig dogwood)
September 07, 2011 - My red-twig dogwood has white/black striped caterpillars that congregate on the underside of the leaves and they are stripping the leaves. What can I do? They almost look like Monarch butterfly larvae...
view the full question and answer

Xeriscaping in clay on a slope in Fort Worth
April 06, 2006 - Xeriscaping in clay (Fort Worth) on a slope -- Please offer suggestions and publications. Thanks
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center