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Tuesday - January 15, 2013

From: Los Angeles, CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives, Watering, Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Water requirements for fruit trees in California
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Dear Sir; In which of these options (fruit trees) the need for watering in irrigation process is higher than the others: -Olive tree -Nectarines and peaches trees -Hazelnut trees -Pistachios and Almonds trees Thank you.


Our focus and expertise are with plants native to North America.  Here is our mission statement:

"The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes."

Of the trees you name above, only Corylus cornuta var. californica (California hazelnut) is native to California and North America. Peaches and nectarines (Prunus persica) are of Asian origins; almonds (Prunus dulcis) are native to the Middle East and northern Africa; pistachios (Pistacia vera) originated in Asia; and the olive (Olea europaea) comes from the Mediterranean and northern Africa.

Your questions would be better answered by the Los Angeles County office of the University of California Cooperative Extension Service.  They should be able to supply you with the answers you need.


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