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Thursday - November 08, 2012

From: Amston, CT
Region: Northeast
Topic: Propagation, Seeds and Seeding, Trees
Title: Male pollinator to produce berries on Juniperus virginiana from Amston CT
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We have planted 3 juniperus virginiana 'Glauca' (on our Connecticut property) that have a few blue berries on them. Will they need a male pollinator to make berries? We do not have other juniperus virginiana in the area, but do have some juniperus communus.

ANSWER:

According to this USDA Forest Service website on Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar), this tree is dioecious, with both male and female plants. However, from Desert USA, we found this paragraph:

"Junipers bear both male and female cones, although the female cones are often referred to as “berries.” Most junipers are dioecious, meaning male and female cones are found on separate trees. Some trees may bear both types of cones."

If you follow this link, Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar), to our webpage on this plant, you will get more information on the tree, including that it is native to Connecticut, so there very well may be male trees in your area.

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

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