En EspaÑol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Propagation of Mountain Laurel by seed

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - March 28, 2007

From: Dripping Springs, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagation of Mountain Laurel by seed
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I harvested the seed or nut from our Mountain Laurel this spring and I would like to propagate them in containers for at least a year and then transfer them to the ground. I live in Hays County, TX in rocky "Hill Country" terrain. Do I remove the hull (some of them came out spontaneously) or plant them in the shell? Is there a pre-planting treatment? How deep should I set them? Is there a particular orientation? Should I use the local soil? Should they get started in shade/partial shade/sun? How much watering?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants has some personal experience starting Sophora secundiflora (mountain laurel) and has these recommendations:

1. Yes, remove the shell.

2. Jill Nokes in How to Grow Native Plants of Texas and the Southwest says: "Germination ... is delayed by a hard seed coat. Seeds may be filed or mechanically scarified with a knife." Another way to scarify the seeds is to rub them with coarse sandpaper. The idea is to penetrate the seed cover enough to allow the seed to imbibe water. Another method that gives almost 100% germination is to soak the seeds in water for 2-4 weeks before planting. Since the seeds are poisonous, you should soak the seeds in a container that you can throw away, such as a used plastic bottle. Mr. Smarty Plants had about 50% yield on untreated seeds just planted in potting soil in a flower pot.

3. About 2-3 times the width of the seed should be a good depth for planting. Jill Nokes also advises planting in a pot that is tall enough for the little laurel to be able to develop a good long root system in the pot that will support it when it is transplanted to outdoors.

4. There is no particular orientation to plant the seed.

5. You can use potting soil or local soil with potting soil added if your local soil is very clayey.

6. They should be grown in partial shade. Jill Nokes recommends 30% shade in the first year.

7. Water often enough to keep the soil from completely drying out. Be sure that the pot allows good drainage.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

Texas mountain laurel
Sophora secundiflora

More Propagation Questions

Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) frost tolerance, making cuttings
October 08, 2007 - Dear Madam or Sir, It would be very kind, if you could answer my questions about the “Thuja Plicata atrovirens” alias “Western Red Cedar”. I need the information because a good friend of mine ...
view the full question and answer

How can I propagate Magnolia trees? Airlayeringg, semi-hardwood cuttings, and seeds.
July 01, 2008 - Hi. My grandmother recently passed away. One of her most prized possessions was her magnolia tree. She absolutely loved that tree. I, along with other members of the family each want to take a pie...
view the full question and answer

Germination and propagation of Carolina larkspur
September 02, 2007 - I have some Delphinium carolinianum seeds and I am looking to germinate and propagate them. I threw some out on my caliche rubble Four years ago,and got one to germinate four years later. What time o...
view the full question and answer

Propagating Texas Mountain Laurel by seed from Tucson AZ
May 20, 2010 - Propagation of Texas Mountain Laurel from seed
view the full question and answer

Pollination of dwarf wax myrtles in Lucas TX
January 02, 2010 - I recently planted 3 dwarf wax myrtles then realized all were females. Do you know if the full-sized version can be used to pollinate the dwarfs? Any idea how close the pollinator needs to be?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center