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Saturday - June 09, 2012

From: Duncanville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources, Propagation, Wildflowers
Title: Gathering seeds of Indian Blanket from Duncanville TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We have a field full of Indian Blanket that are blooming now and would like to share some seeds with our friends! Where is the seed on them and I take it we wait till they are done blooming to get them?

ANSWER:

Gaillardia pulchella (Indian Blanket) is an annual, so it is a very good idea to distribute seeds to others. From our webpage on this plant (follow plant link above to read all of it) here are the Propagation Instructions:

"Propagation Material: Seeds
Description: Plant in the fall and rake the seed into loose topsoil to ensure good seed/soil contact. With moisture from rain or watering, G. pulchella will germinate in 1 – 2 weeks and establish a healthy taproot system before the winter frost. If sowing seed indoors in late winter, allow 8 weeks for well-rooted seedling before transplanting at start of frost-free period.
Seed Collection: After flowering ceases, allow seeds to completely mature before mowing for reseeding or collecting to plant in a new area. Look for heads with no dried petals persisting. Since G. pulchella is an annual, it is essential that this species be allowed to reseed for an abundant display the following year.
Seed Treatment: Dried seeds can be stored refrigerated up to four years.
Maintenance: One of the easiest wildfowers to establish. Although Indian blanket will grow in a variety of soil types, for best results, choose an open to lightly shaded site having loose, well-drained soil. G. pulchella frequently exhibits blanket-like density, which combines with the blending of bright reds and yellows to form a striking tapestry of color."

This plant blooms from May to August, which means some of the blooms may have already matured and have seeds ready to gather. You can leave some to deposit seeds where they are and remove others to share; you do not have to wait until all have bloomed.

 

From the Image Gallery


Firewheel
Gaillardia pulchella

Firewheel
Gaillardia pulchella

Firewheel
Gaillardia pulchella

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