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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - May 03, 2012

From: Concord, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Planting, Erosion Control, Grasses or Grass-like, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs
Title: Steep slope from Charlotte NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live near Charlotte, NC and I have a very steep sloped area from the edge of our front yard down to the road. It's a huge eyesore mainly because it is red clay dirt and has nothing growing on it. We also have two very large trees directly beside the hills so it gives us a very hard time with all of the roots. Please help, what plant - annual flower/vine - do you recommend and what do I do to make sure it grows?

ANSWER:

Boy, you do have problems with clay slopes in North Carolina. We did a quick scan of previous Mr. Smarty Plant questions on this subject and found several that had good answers and even plant lists, and all from North Carolina.

Durham, NC - Durham County, very close to Wake and Chatham Counties

Cary, NC - Wake and Chatham Counties

Charlotte, in Mecklenburg County, is on the central southern border of North Carolina with South Carolina.

So, we're thinking that the plant lists and instructions on the previous questions should be of help to you, and we won't be repeating ourselves. As for making them grow, you have made a vital first step in using plants native to the region. Follow each plant link on the lists of plants to our webpage on that plant, and read how much moisture, sunlight, etc. it needs and place the plants accordingly in your garden.

 

 

 

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