En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Plants for bees in GA

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - February 18, 2011

From: Athens, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Wildlife Gardens
Title: Plants for bees in GA
Answered by: Anne Bossart

QUESTION:

Hi, I'm in Georgia and I am starting beekeeping this spring and I am also hoping to plant a mostly evergreen hedge around my yard to add privacy from neighbors. There are already some well established pine and other trees so the hedge is part to semi shade, to full shade in some places. I would like to plant mostly evergreens, but some deciduous, shrub type plants that are native and will naturalize well, but that will also provide a good source for honeybees all throughout the year. Thank you!

ANSWER:

 Landscaping for wildlife and polllinators is a great way to "give back" some of the habitat/ecosystem that we have taken with our built environment so we applaud your efforts.

We encourage you to contact your local agricultural extension service and check out this link to the University of Georgia Honey Bee Program.  They will be able to give you more locally helpful information about plants and can probably put you in contact with a local organization like our local SMABeeWranglers.

You will find that bees are not particular about where they gather nectar and so you will find many non-native plants on lists you may find by doing an internet search.

Unfortunately, our database cannot sort plants according to their wildlife benefit, but that characteristic is noted on the detailed plant information page.  So if you visit the database and do a Combination Search for Georgia, selecting the plant type (shrub) and your conditions (shade and part shade) it will generate lists of plants with links to the detailed page.  You can also create separate lists for bloom time (as you know, your bees will be looking for food throughout the growing season).

Here are some plants that are native to Georgia and may be of interest:

Blooms early spring

Cercis canadensis (Eastern redbud)

Fothergilla gardenii (Dwarf witchalder)

Ilex decidua (Possumhaw)

(all the hollies are good nectar sources for bees)

Blooms spring/summer

Amorpha fruticosa (Indigo bush)

Cephalanthus occidentalis (Common buttonbush)

Vaccinium corymbosum (Highbush blueberry)

Blooms mid summer

Aralia spinosa (Devil's walkingstick)

Baccharis halimifolia (Groundseltree)

Clethra alnifolia (Coastal sweet pepperbush)


Cercis canadensis


Fothergilla gardenii


Ilex decidua


Amorpha fruticosa


Cephalanthus occidentalis


Vaccinium corymbosum


Aralia spinosa


Baccharis halimifolia


Clethra alnifolia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Wildlife Gardens Questions

Colony of bees nesting in sycamore
July 06, 2010 - I have a very large, old sycamore tree that has recently become home to a colony of honey bees. They have taken up dwelling in a hollow limb of the tree about 25 feet off the ground. While this is gre...
view the full question and answer

Native trees that host moths and butterflies for birds in Houston Texas
April 05, 2010 - I have learned that non-native or alien plants do not attract the insects that the birds need to live on. I would like to know which native trees for central Texas have the greatest hosting capacity ...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for East Texas school gardens
May 19, 2008 - I am a teacher in San Augustine, Texas (which is in the Eastern Pineywoods region). I have started an outdoor classroom/schoolyard habitat at our school. We are in the process of planning our plant ...
view the full question and answer

Caterpillars on Carolina buckthorn (Frangula caroliniana)
September 29, 2007 - I have a Carolina buckthorn and last year there were interesting looking caterpillars munching on the leaves. They were camouflaged to look a bit like bird droppings. The plant database makes no ment...
view the full question and answer

Neighborhood association wanting wildflowers mowed from Grand Prairie TX
July 14, 2013 - For at least 15 years, I have been fostering growth of wildflowers in 60% of my 90x400' yard which include 150' utility trunkline easement in which I can plant no trees. This year, we had volunteer ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center