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Thursday - February 04, 2010

From: Redhill, England
Region: Other
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Date for visitor from England to see bluebonnets
Answered by: Barbara Medford


Hi there I live in England, and I'm planning a trip to Texas to photograph the wildflowers around Austin and the hill country. I especially want to photograph bluebonnets. I can be in Texas either 29 March-3 April, or 7-12 April. Any idea which would be my best bet? Many thanks!


Either of those dates should be fine.  Quoting from an earlier answer:

"Early April is very consistently the height of the flowering season for Lupinus texensis (Texas bluebonnet) in Central Texas.  Weather conditions can vary the season by just a few days either way, but not enough to really notice.  Weather plays a greater role in the development of any year's Bluebonnet crop.  In general, good fall rains improve the show for the following season.  However, other variables such as germination rate, competing winter grasses, etc, also affect the flower crop.

So far this year (keeping our fingers crossed) the crop for spring of 2010 looks very promising." 

We are having good rains for the first time in at least two years, and hope you will be able to schedule a visit to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin on your tour. 

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis



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