En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Saturday - January 31, 2009

From: Trinidad, CO
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Medicinal Plants, Trees
Title: Tree that successfully treats psoriasis
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Dear Mr. Smarty plants,I have a rather unusual question. Do you know of a tree/plant that you can grow in a container, looks like a conifer/evergreen, is green, has wispy looking branches, but when transplanting, you have to be very careful of the roots, or the plant will die, has red bark, and when sprouting produces a rose like flower and grows into a tree? This plant also will cure eczema/psoriasis? I received this information from a friend who gave me as much detail as they could remember about this plant to help with eczema. Unfortunately, they didn't have a picture of said plant or name.

ANSWER:

The Native American Ethnobotany database from the University of Michigan-Dearborn lists Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) and Abies grandis (grand fir) as being used by the Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, British Columbia to treat psoriasis. Here are photos of Abies grandis and you can see photos of seedlings of these two plants from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.  Certainly, either of these plants somewhat fits your description.  Foster and Duke in Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America, p. 325, also report Pinus contorta being used for treatment of psoriasis.

From the Internet Health Library Mahonia aquifolium (hollyleaved barberry), another North American native, is reported as being useful for treatment of psoriasis, but this plant doesn't really fit your description.

You can google "medicinal plant psoriasis" and find other plants (i.e., Indigofera tinctoria, a native of Asia and Africa) that are named as treatments for psoriasis.  However, I did not find other native plants of North America reported as being effective against psoriasis.

I know that you said that you don't have a photo of the plant.  If you do, however, come across a photo, please send it to us and we will do our best to identify it.  Visit the Ask Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read instructions for submitting photos. 

 

From the Image Gallery


Lodgepole pine
Pinus contorta

Holly-leaved barberry
Mahonia aquifolium

More Trees Questions

Replacing river birch from Maple Grove MN
April 22, 2014 - How soon after taking out a river birch clump tree and grinding the stump would we be able to plant a new birch clump?
view the full question and answer

Need help with a Pecan tree that has been topped in Austin, TX.
July 06, 2010 - Hi Mr. Smarty Plants! I have a pecan tree on my property that was topped by the previous owners. I have searched high and low for information on how to correctly prune a tree that has already been ...
view the full question and answer

Planting under Walnut Trees in Harrisville, MI.
July 22, 2009 - I have 2 50+ yr old Black Walnut trees in Northern Michigan (zone 4). I am planting a new bed (raised of course) and was considering adding a hydrangea. I am curious if this will thrive due to the jug...
view the full question and answer

Japanese maple in New York
August 15, 2008 - I have a few questions: Do you know what zone Brooklyn, NY. is in? If I plant a Japanese Maple in my backyard, do you think it can tolerate almost full shade (1-2 hours of sun per day)? Also, is it...
view the full question and answer

Splitting bark on non-native mimosa from Buda TX
June 24, 2012 - What would cause my Mimosa tree to have splitting bark. I've only lived in this house for 8 months and am learning about this tree. The other tree seems fine. It looks as though it split and then ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center