En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - September 23, 2008

From: Azle, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Grasses for shady area with sandy soil
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We have very sandy soil, is there any type of grass that will grow well. Also, very shady.

ANSWER:

Here are grasses that will grow in sandy soil and part shade (2 to 6 hours of sun per day) in Tarrant County.  Several of them (those designated) will also grow in shade (less than 2 hours of sun per day).

Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem)

Andropogon ternarius (splitbeard bluestem)

Andropogon virginicus (broomsedge bluestem)

Bouteloua curtipendula (sideoats grama) shade

Bouteloua dactyloides (buffalograss)

Bouteloua hirsuta (hairy grama)

Chasmanthium latifolium (Inland sea oats) shade

Chloris virgata (feather fingergrass)

Elymus canadensis (Canada wildrye) shade

Eragrostis intermedia (plains lovegrass)

Paspalum floridanum (Florida paspalum)

Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem)

Sorghastrum nutans (Indiangrass) shade

Tridens flavus (purpletop tridens)


Andropogon gerardii

Andropogon ternarius

Andropogon virginicus

Bouteloua curtipendula

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua hirsuta

Chasmanthium latifolium

Chloris virgata

Elymus canadensis

Eragrostis intermedia

Paspalum floridanum

Schizachyrium scoparium

Sorghastrum nutans

Tridens flavus

 

 

 

More Shade Tolerant Questions

Shrubs, groundcovers, and grasses for shade in North Central Texas
March 19, 2010 - Updated (2009-10) information about shrubs / ground cover /grasses recommended for North Central Texas - Complete back yard re-landscaping under a lot of trees, shady areas, regular bermuda, St Augus...
view the full question and answer

Shade tolerant Wildflowers for Oklahoma City
April 16, 2012 - I live in Oklahoma City. I'm not in town very often, and am seeking low maintenance plants. I have MANY trees in my backyard, which makes it quite shady. I have raised beds amongst my rock garden ...
view the full question and answer

Spring blooming plants for spring sun and summer shade
July 03, 2007 - I live in San Antonio. I'm faced with a dilemma. I've got mature native pecans. In the summer they provide beautiful full shade. However, in the winter and even into the late spring, my yard is ...
view the full question and answer

Native perennials for moist shade in Missouri
January 16, 2005 - I live near Adrian, Mo (s of KC by an hour). I currently have a small hillside that is covered by trees and shaded all day and also seems to hold moisture really well. The hill seems to grow a littl...
view the full question and answer

Native ground covers for rocky, shady slope in Arlington, TX
January 25, 2009 - I need a good native ground cover for a completely shaded and rocky 30 degree slope with red sandy soil and southern exposure. Will anything grow in these conditions?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center