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Tuesday - September 02, 2008

From: Saskatoon, SK
Region: Canada
Topic: Invasive Plants, Planting, Transplants, Vines
Title: Transplanting Virginia creeper
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a large Virginia creeper plant approximately 15 feet in length. Is it possible to transplant the whole thing without killing it? If so how do I care for it after it has been moved? Thank you in advance for any help you can offer me

ANSWER:

In the South, Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper) is more often considered an extremely invasive weed than a candidate for transplanting. Before you make a final decision on transplant or dig up and throw away, read the comments on the Dave's Garden forum Parthenocissus quinquefolia. This plant also propagates itself by berries, which can easily spread into the gardens of people who really don't want it. 

According to the information we found, it is better planted from a container; however, you obviously don't have that option. Considering the time of year, you might consider digging up the main root, and transplanting it to a pot with good potting soil in it, and trimming off the excess trailing vine, which will very quickly grow back. The loss of the suckers on the vine won't matter, and you can winter it over in a sheltered place, and then plant back in the ground in the desired spot next Spring. If you really want to transplant the whole thing, this is probably a good time to do it in Canada. Prepare a bed of soft, moist soil the length of the vine. Dig up the main root, still not worrying about the suckers, and replant in the bed. Either the old suckers will dig into that soil, or new ones will develop, but the main root should survive.  But are you sure you want it to?


Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

 

 

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