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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - March 20, 2014

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Wildflower Center work on non-native, invasive Bastard Cabbage from Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Still have cabbage weeds that infiltrated Austin awhile back. How did Wildflower Center resolve it?

ANSWER:

Sadly, matters like invasive Rapistrum rugosum (Bastard Cabbage) seldom actually get "resolved" even by the stout-hearted gardeners at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. That doesn't mean they have given up nor that they are not continuing control measures.

From our How To Articles, please read Addressing Texas Invasive Plants.

For everyone concerned about these invasions, the word is there is no easy solution. This will take the attention, dedication and HARD WORK for all of us to even reduce the spread of this monster.

Lessons to take away:

If it is not native to your area, don't plant it.

If you have a seed "mix" not from a reputable native plant supplier, don't plant it.

If you see it growing, any size, anywhere, don't leave it there.

If anyone admires those yellow flowers on the hillside, tell them what it is.

And repeat Steps 1 through 4 above to anyone who asks. That's what we do.

 

 

 

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