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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Wednesday - July 13, 2011

From: Columbus, OH
Region: Midwest
Topic: Privacy Screening, Shrubs
Title: Shrubs for privacy in wet area in Ohio
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am looking for flowering shrubs for Ohio that reach 8-10 feet and can handle wet feet. I am trying to avoid building a wall for privacy and would like to use flowering shrubs instead.

ANSWER:

There are several possibilities for a flowering shrub that will tolerate 'wet feet' for a privacy screen there in Columbus.  To find them I did a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database choosing "Ohio" from the Select State or Province option, "Shrub" from Habit (general appearance) and "Wet - soil..." from Soil moisture.  Below are ones that sound as if they meet your criteria.  You could do the same search yourself to see if there are others that strike your fancy.  It might be that "Moist - soil..." better describes your area.  You could search using it as well as, or instead of, "Wet - soil...".

Cephalanthus occidentalis (Common buttonbush)

 Cornus amomum (Silky dogwood) and here are more photos and more information.

Lindera benzoin (Northern spicebush)

Physocarpus opulifolius (Atlantic ninebark)

Rhododendron maximum (Great laurel)

Rosa palustris (Swamp rose)

Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (Common elderberry)

Vaccinium corymbosum (Highbush blueberry)

 

From the Image Gallery


Common buttonbush
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Common buttonbush
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Silky dogwood
Cornus amomum

Northern spicebush
Lindera benzoin

Northern spicebush
Lindera benzoin

Common ninebark
Physocarpus opulifolius

Common ninebark
Physocarpus opulifolius

Great laurel
Rhododendron maximum

Great laurel
Rhododendron maximum

Common elderberry
Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis

Common elderberry
Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis

Highbush blueberry
Vaccinium corymbosum

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