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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - May 08, 2012

From: SACRAMENTO, CA
Region: California
Topic: Privacy Screening, Shrubs
Title: Evergreen screening plant for California
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am looking for an evergreen plant that can be used as a screen. Maybe something wispy. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

I'm not sure how wispy you consider any of the following suggestions, but they are evergreen and will do well in Central California.

You might consider the manzanitas.   There are several species of Arctostaphylos sp. (manzanitas) that will do well in Central California with little water.  A couple of possibilities are Arctostaphylos glauca (Bigberry manzanita) and Arctostaphylos glandulosa (Eastwood's manzanita).

Cercocarpus montanus (Alderleaf mountain mahogany) is another evergreen shrub that should do well.

Morella californica (California wax myrtle) is evergreen and good as a hedge.  Here are photos and more information.

Baccharis pilularis (Coyotebrush) and here are more photos and information.

Ceanothus leucodermis (Chaparral whitethorn) and there are more species of Ceanothus that are evergreen and grow in Central California.

Frangula californica (California buckthorn) and here are photos and more informatiion.

Malacothamnus fasciculatus (Mendocino bushmallow) and here are photos and more information.

Below are photographs of some of the species that appear in our database.

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastwood's manzanita
Arctostaphylos glandulosa

Bigberry manzanita
Arctostaphylos glauca

Alderleaf mountain mahogany
Cercocarpus montanus

Coyotebrush
Baccharis pilularis

Chaparral whitethorn
Ceanothus leucodermis

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