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Wednesday - May 27, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Looking for a good cultivar of Prunus mexicana.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Has anyone come up with a good cultivar of Prunus Mexicana? As in, one selected from the wild? Or a hybrid with a European plum? I'd like one in my yard (I have also wanted a good Purple Leaf Plum, but I don't think that is going to fruit well here and fruit is what I want.)

ANSWER:

Mexican plum Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum) is a native plant that can be found throughout  eastern Texas, and eastward to the Atlantic coast as far north as North Carolina. This link describes its occurrence also in Seattle. Prunus mexicana is carried by several nurseries, but I haven't found any plants designated as a 'cultivar'. Check our Suppliers Directory  to find a nursery near you that has the plant.

The Purple Leaf Plum, Prunus cerasifera is a non-native species that was introduced from Iran by way of France. There are over fifty varieties  available, and for the most part, their fruit is unremarkable. They are generally recommended as specimen trees or shade trees.


Prunus mexicana

 

 Prunus cerasifera images.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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