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Tuesday - July 21, 2015

From: Jacksonville, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Planting, Propagation, Erosion Control, Ferns, Grasses or Grass-like, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs, Trees
Title: Stopping erosion on bank of a Florida retention pond
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

I live on a retention pond, which has had all vegetation killed by the lake doctor. As a result the bank has eroded so there is a drop off directly to the water rather than a sloping bank. What plants can I use to prevent further erosion. The pond drains into the St. John's river.

ANSWER:

I made a search of our website for moisture-loving plants well suited for Florida.  Check out this site for species that fit your needs as to size, sun or shade preferences, etc.  I include below a few species, chosen almost at random from the list, for your consideration.

Adiantum capillus-veneris (Southern maidenhair fern)Andropogon glomeratus (Bushy bluestem)Athyrium filix-femina ssp. asplenioides (Southern lady fern)Carex cherokeensis (Cherokee sedge)Carex hyalinolepis (Shoreline sedge)Viburnum nudum (Possumhaw viburnum)Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (Common elderberry)Salix nigra (Black willow)Populus deltoides (Eastern cottonwood)Lobelia cardinalis (Cardinal flower)Cephalanthus occidentalis (Common buttonbush)Equisetum hyemale (Scouringrush horsetail), and Iris virginica (Virginia iris).

Many of these plants should be available at your local plant nurseries.

 

 

 

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