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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Saturday - March 17, 2007

From: Northglenn, CO
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Native wildflowers for Denver, Colorado area
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in the Denver, CO area and would like to plant more native wildflowers. Can you please tell me where I can find a list?

ANSWER:

You can visit our Regional Fastpacks page and find the Rocky Mountain Recommended Native Plant Species List. The list is divided into sections for different types of plants (e.g., Cacti and Succulents, Ferns, Grasses, etc.) and gives the botanical and common names, the native range (i.e., the state), and comments about size, bloom time, and habitat preference for each plant.

Here are a few selections from that list:

SHRUBS

Fallugia paradoxa (Apache plume)

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (kinnikinnick)

Mahonia aquifolium (hollyleaved barberry) or Mahonia repens (creeping barberry)


HERBACEOUS

Arnica cordifolia (heartleaf arnica)

Castilleja linariifolia (Wyoming Indian paintbrush)

Campanula rotundifolia (bluebell bellflower)

Echinacea angustifolia (blacksamson echinacea)

Zinnia grandiflora (Rocky Mountain zinnia)

 


Fallugia paradoxa

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Mahonia repens

 


Campanula rotundifolia

Zinnia grandiflora

Arnica cordifolia

Echinacea angustifolia

Castilleja linariifolia

 

 

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