En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - January 30, 2013

From: Elmendorf, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Texas native peach from Elmendorf TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Does Texas have a native peach tree that grows wild?

ANSWER:

Prunus andersonii (Desert peach), as shown in this USDA Plant Profile as native only to California and Nevada.

Prunus texana (Peachbush) - USDA Plant Profile shows it is native to Bexar County, TX.

These native Texas trees have other common names, including Sand Plum, Texas Plum and Texas Peach Bush. The peaches you see in the grocery store are also members of the Prunus genus, but Prunus Persica, which is the commercially grown peach, is native to China and southern Asia.

If you grow the Prunus texana (Peachbush), you need to remember that all parts of a Prunus are poisonous except the flesh of the fruit, and even in that, the seed is poisonous. In other words, a Texas peach bush shedding leaves or twigs could be a poisoning danger to pets or livestock. We could not find any information about the taste or texture of the fruit of this plant. We suggest you contact the Texas A&M Agrilife Extension for Bexar County. County extension offices tend to have more information on raising edible plants. There is contact information on that webpage.

 

From the Image Gallery


Peachbush
Prunus texana

Peachbush
Prunus texana

Peachbush
Prunus texana

More Trees Questions

Why aren't all blue spruce trees blue?
February 07, 2010 - I have been looking at blue spruce trees recently and I have noticed at a couple tree farms that not all blue spruce look blue at all. Some that are listed as Co. Blue Spruce are very green. The sha...
view the full question and answer

Premature browning of bald cypress needles in summer
July 15, 2011 - I have several 10m high taxodium distichum trees in the lawn, with drip irrigation twice a week, and same soil content, and on just one of them, several leaves have started turning brown, it seems to ...
view the full question and answer

Slow development in Shumard Oak from Porter TX
April 02, 2013 - We had two Shumard Oaks Planted in Sept of last year (2012). About a month later, they started browning and dropping their leaves (no color change). Now I noticed on one of the trees the buds have sta...
view the full question and answer

Theory for live oak shoots from Austin
August 25, 2011 - More on preventing suckers from coming up around live oaks in Austin. I too have been puzzled - why some live oaks have shoots, and not others. Posting here says different varieties have suckers. ...
view the full question and answer

At what age does Possumhaw (Ilex decidua) begin to flower in Pflugerville, TX?
January 13, 2011 - At what age does a female possumhaw (Ilex decidua) usually bloom and set fruit? Or is there a way to identify the female other than by the presence of berries? I grew a number from seed and want to ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center