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Thursday - January 26, 2012

From: Archer, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Planting fruit and nut trees in Archer, FL.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

We're looking to plant a few fruit and nut trees in Archer, Florida. We've been thinking about figs, apples, peaches, oranges, plums, and whatever nuts grow best here (looks like almonds and pecans?), but which ones are suggested for this area?

ANSWER:

For starters, let me state that the mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes. Of the plants you mentioned, only two are native to the US. Pecan Carya illinoinensis (Pecan) is native to the US, but only a few counties in Florida (Levey is closest to you). There are several native species of wild plum in the genus Prunus found throughout the US. Prunus angustifolia (Chickasaw plum) is agood example.

I would suggest that you consult the folks at the Alachua County office of the University of Florida IFAS Extension for their suggestions. In the meantime, here are some links  (several are from IFAS Extension) that can help you in your quest for fruit and nut trees.

Figs

Apples

Peaches

Oranges

Plums

Almonds

Pecans

You might find this answer to a previous question interesting.

 

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