En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Sunday - December 16, 2012

From: Naperville, IL
Region: Midwest
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Vines
Title: Lonicera sempervirens not harmful to dogs from Naperville IL
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Is the trumpet honeysuckle (lonicera sempervirens) harmful to dogs if eaten? I have been told in the past that the common trumpet vine is harmful, but this appears to be different. Thank you!!

ANSWER:

We think you have two native vines confused -  Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) and Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle). However, the scientific name you gave us, Lonicera sempervirens (Coral honeysuckle), is certainly correct, and both it and Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) are native to Illinois. You can follow the plant links to our webpages on both. Neither have any indication of being poisonous on their webpages, but Campsis radicans (Trumpet creeper) has sap that can cause skin irritation on contact. Both of these vines are capable of being invasive, but the trumpet creeper can be really  invasive, so the honeysuckle would be preferable. 

Just for your own comfort level, here are some plant lists you can consult when you are concerned about whether a plant might be harmful to your dogs:

Poisonous Plants of North Carolina

Texas Toxic Plant Database

Cornell University Plants Poisonous to Livestock

University of Pennsylvania Poisonous Plants Database

Plus, none of the lists specific for dogs (Humane Society of the United States, the ASPCA and Doberdogs) that I found has it named.

 

From the Image Gallery


Coral honeysuckle
Lonicera sempervirens

Trumpet creeper
Campsis radicans

More Poisonous Plants Questions

Are Smilax species toxic?
October 23, 2009 - I have a plant that the agriculture department told me was similax. I have a severe allergic reaction to it, after digging up the roots (potato) and burning them. I had a feeling my lungs inside were ...
view the full question and answer

Is Thalia dealbata toxic to dogs?
May 16, 2011 - A pond in a park frequented by dogs contains Thalia dealbata and I have seen numerous dogs eating the roots with relish, which we discourage, of course. They seem to really enjoy it though. Aft...
view the full question and answer

Dwarf oyster plant dying in Sunrise FL
July 06, 2012 - WHAT WOULD BE KILLING MY DWARF OYSTER PLANTS
view the full question and answer

Drought-tolerant plants that are non-toxic to dogs
May 10, 2010 - I am looking for drought-tolerant native plants non-poisonious to dogs. We are putting gardens in an area the dog has access to, and she likes to sample the darndest things. South side of the house,...
view the full question and answer

Plants in wheelbarrow dying in Jacksonville, FL
June 22, 2011 - I planted a wheelbarrow with daisies, petunias and black and blue salvia. the salvia is thriving, but the others died. Is the salvia toxic to them?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center