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Monday - July 14, 2008

From: Baltimore, MD
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Vines
Title: Vines for side of home
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Can you suggest a native vine for Central Maryland? The intent is for the vine to grow up the southern face of a vinyl sided home to make the home more attractive but also to provide some reduction of heat gain to the wall from the southern exposure.

ANSWER:

Here are four vines that are native to Maryland and are commercially available. You can search for nurseries and seed companies that specialize in native plants in your area in our National Suppliers Directory. All four of these vines have the added feature of being attractive butterflies and/or hummingbirds.

Campsis radicans (trumpet creeper)

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle)

Passiflora incarnata (purple passionflower)

Wisteria frutescens (American wisteria)

Depending on how rough the surface of your house is, you might need to add a trellis or some framework for the vines to climb on (e.g., monofilament nylon lines attached to stakes in the ground and to the eaves of the house).


Campsis radicans

Lonicera sempervirens

Passiflora incarnata

Wisteria frutescens

 

 

 

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