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Mr. Smarty Plants - Preventing armadillos from digging up lawn for grubs

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Friday - September 29, 2006

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Turf
Title: Preventing armadillos from digging up lawn for grubs
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Over the past 4 months we have endured an armadillo digging up our lawn. We are now seeking a humane method to discourage the armadillo from digging up the grubs in our lawn. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks.

ANSWER:

Armadillos do love those grubs!

To keep your lawn from being destroyed you need to take a two-step approach. First, you need to trap the offenders and relocate them. You can see the different versions of live traps available for purchase by Googling "live traps". As well as being for sale on line, they should be available for purchase at pet stores, feed stores, or sporting goods stores and may even be available to rent from some of the locally-owned, non-chain, pet stores or sporting goods stores.

After you have relocated your armadillo(s), you will need to take measures to keep others from moving in. Fencing with a sturdy fence that extends into the ground is one possibility. Another possibility is a low (in voltage and height) electric fence. That wouldn't be a good choice, however, if you have children, pets, or inattentive adults walking in the area. Another possibility is using chemical repellents. There are several chemical repellents offered for armadillos that are touted to be effective.

Here are several internet articles about controlling armadillos that go into greater detail on the points above:
Armadillo Control
Controlling Armadillow Damage in Alabama
Armadillos: Control, Biology, Identification of Armadillos

 

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