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Thursday - October 11, 2012

From: Cedar Park, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Transplants, Trees
Title: When to transplant volunteer Cedar Elms in Cedar Park, TX?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

We have a number of volunteer cedar elms we would like to transplant. When is the best time to do this? Should they be potted first and later transplanted or transplanted immediately? Thanks.

ANSWER:

Cedar Elm Ulmus crassifolia (Cedar elm) is a hardy Texas native that should do well in Cedar Park. I’m going to provide some links that will let you get to know the tree better, plus some transplanting tips.
   Native Plant Society of Texas
    “The many beneficial traits of cedar elm”

    “March 2011 Plant of the Month” <  > (indicates that it is easy to transplant)

     University of Florida 

   Transplanting tips

       University of North Dakota

        Morton Arboretum

From the information that I have read, a good time to transplant is when the tree has become dormant, so wait until the end of November or later. I think that potting the trees and then replanting would increase the stress on the plant and decrease your chances of success.

 

From the Image Gallery


Cedar elm
Ulmus crassifolia

Cedar elm
Ulmus crassifolia

Cedar elm
Ulmus crassifolia

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