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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - July 31, 2012

From: Marlin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Trees
Title: Recently planted Chinquapin Oak with browning leaves in Marlin, TX.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

We planted a Chinquapin Oak this in March 2012. As of July 21, 2012, the tips of the leaves on the lower branches are turning brown. We cannot see any insects. There does not appear to be any fungus on the leaves that you can see. Soil is a sandy loam with a clay subsoil. We are in east Falls County, Texas about 100 miles NE of Austin.

ANSWER:

Whenever Mr. Smarty Plants hears about newly planted trees having problems, his thoughts turn to transplant shock.  When plants are moved from location to another, it takes a while for the roots to adjust to their new environment and become established well enough to support the shoots. These two links to northscaping.com can help you get your oak tree through these trying times.

Ten Tips for Minimizing Transplant Shock

First Year Tree and Shrub Care 

 

From the Image Gallery


Chinkapin oak
Quercus muehlenbergii

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