En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Planting wildflowers in spring for spring bloom

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - March 02, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Seeds and Seeding, Wildflowers
Title: Planting wildflowers in spring for spring bloom
Answered by: Guy Thompson

QUESTION:

I was wondering if it is possible to plant wildflowers around this time of year, and expect them to bloom in the spring still? I have heard that many wildflowers germinate in the fall. Are there certain types of wildflowers that might do better for this late winter planting for spring blooming? Thank you, Edna Martin

ANSWER:

I'm afraid it is almost certainly too late to plant spring-flowering wildflower seeds and expect them to bloom this April and May.  As you know, the typical Texas wildflowers, such as bluebonnet, Indian blanket, and coreopsis, are usually planted in the fall, giving them time to form good roots and a rosette during the winter.

Your best bet is to visit a local native plant nursery and buy enough established wildflower plants to make a small showing this year and plant seeds this coming fall for next year.  An alternative is to purchase a seed mixture such as the Lady Bird Legacy Wildflower Mix, which contains not only spring- but summer-blooming species.  Planting these seeds now would at least give you flowers by June.  Or, narrowing your search through the species in this  Lady Bird Legacy Wildflower Mix, you could sort out some annual plants by checking the appropriate box in the right margin.  Annual plants usually grow much faster than perennials and therefore would be more likely to bloom earlier.  Seeds of these individual species might be available commercially.  On the Wildflower Center home page, check Suppliers under the pull down menu Explore Plants for local seed suppliers.

I wish you a bloomin' good time this summer.

 

More Seeds and Seeding Questions

Standing Cypress Plants in San Antonio, TX
June 26, 2013 - I purchased seeds for standing cypress 2 years ago and this spring they look beautiful. What is the best way to harvest the seeds? Also, will the current plants come back next spring or will I have to...
view the full question and answer

Dealing with rain runoff on a slope in Austin
March 24, 2012 - Our lawn is a year old and slopes at about a 45 degree angle with a lot of small holes and tiny gullies from water run-off. I have tried packing them with soil, but it washes away in the rain. Would ...
view the full question and answer

Photograph of seedling or pigeon berry (Rivina humilis) seedling
January 13, 2009 - Where can I find a photograph of a pigeon berry seedling?
view the full question and answer

Desmodium spp. (beggar's lice) in Leander TX
November 11, 2011 - Our home backs up to a greenbelt on Blockhouse Creek in Williamson County, Texas (FM 1431 and Parmer Lane). The combination of the flood and drought has left our beautiful greenbelt with an abundance...
view the full question and answer

Seeding success with Penstemon cobaea from Austin
June 18, 2013 - I've never had much luck in harvesting seeds from foxgloves (Penstemon cobaea, I think). Whenever I open the seed casing, the seeds inside are covered with some kind of mold. What's going on, and ho...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center