En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - July 14, 2010

From: Bend, OR
Region: Northwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: When are seeds of Indian paintbrush mature from Bend OR
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How do I know when to collect seeds of Indian paintbrush - when are they mature?

ANSWER:

There are 50 species of the genus Castilleja native to North America and 17 native to Oregon, so we searched those for one that seemed most likely to be growing in your area. Castilleja applegatei (wavyleaf Indian paintbrush) grows in Deschutes County, OR according to the USDA Plant Profile. It also looks very similar to the Indian Paintbrush that we are familiar with in Texas and we will use it for our example. 

We found no Propagation Instructions on this specific Paintbrush, so we are quoting these from the most common Texas paintbrush, Castilleja indivisa.

"Propagation

Propagation Material: Seeds
Description: Seed in open, sunny sites for best results. Indian paintbrush seed may require a cold wet period in the winter to germinate. Plant the seed in the fall and rake it into loose topsoil to ensure good seed/soil contact. Seeds are exceptionally small (4 million seeds per pound), commercially available, depending on the previous year’s seed crop and can be expensive. The recommended seeding rate in 1/4 pound per acre.
Seed Collection: Seeds are formed in capsules at the base of each flower. Seed capsules may be carefully collected by hand April – May when the capsules are dry and brown.
Commercially Avail: yes
Maintenance: After flowering ceases, allow seeds to completely mature before mowing for reseeding or collecting to plant in a new area. Since C. indivisa is an annual, it is essential that this species be allowed to reseed for an abundant display for the following year."

From the website Dave's Garden, we found these instructions on the specific Castilleja applegatei (wavyleaf Indian paintbrush) from personal experience:

"I've since collected seeds from that original plant and have now established this paintbrush in over 20 locations in my garden. I simply collected the seeds as soon as the stems appeared completely dry and scattered them immediately upon the surface of bare un-amended soil somewhere near a known host plant--such as Wright's Buckwheat--'Eriogonum wrightii'. My original Applegate's Paintbrush is also still flourishing and expanding it's terrritory in my dry rocky soil, but the Scarlet Penstemon from which it sprang seems to have succumbed to the parasitical nature of the castilleja." 

The timing of collecting the seeds of Castilleja indivisa (entireleaf Indian paintbrush) may be a little off, since we are in USDA Hardiness Zone 8a and you appear to be in Zone 6a. In you were in Texas, it would already be past the time for collecting seeds, but in Oregon, this may be the time. As you note in the references above, the seeds are very tiny. The plant is an annual, so reseeding from the original is really the only way to keep the flowers in your garden, short of buying seeds every year. You also need to remember that this plant is hemi-parasitic, requiring that there be nitrogen fixing plants in the near vicinity for use by the paintbrush roots. 

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Castilleja applegatei

Castilleja applegatei

Castilleja indivisa

Castilleja indivisa

 

 

 

 

More Propagation Questions

Long term storam of Lupinus arboreus seeds
July 21, 2007 - Hi - I was wondering what the best way to store lupine seeds (for long-term storage and maximum viability) is? I am a graduate student at Berkeley studying Lupinus arboreus. We have been storing seeds...
view the full question and answer

Should a bloom stalk be cut down in Yuma AZ?
May 07, 2010 - I have a plant in my front yard that looks like an aloe vera. It doesn't have any thorns or needles but does have a tall stalk like stem coming from the middle of it. The "stalk" is now approx. 5'...
view the full question and answer

Junipers for restoring area in Bulverde TX
November 03, 2012 - Are ashe or virginiana junipers for sale around the hill country? I would like to recreate the natural plant life that was bulldozed next to my home. Do you recommend any other types of juniper that ...
view the full question and answer

Squirrels eating seed pods of Rock Rose in Austin
June 24, 2011 - Squirrel(s) have been ripping the branches off my rock rose bushes in order to eat the seed pods. Previously we had problems with squirrel(s) gnawing on our garden ornaments. I sprayed the ornaments ...
view the full question and answer

Plants that will grow under a magnolia tree.
April 14, 2010 - We live in California near San Diego and have a Magnolia Tree. We have tried to plant many types of flowers around the tree only to have them die. Is there a particular type of plant that we should ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center