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Wednesday - February 24, 2010

From: charlotte, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Non-invasive, modest-sized shrub for driveway edge
Answered by: Jackie OKeefe


I need a hedge type plant for the end of driveway so cars know how far they can drive in. I would like them to be 3'-5' and the roots not to be too heavy that they raise wood barrier or grow under gravel.


Here are some suggestions. They were generated by going to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Native Plant Database, clicking on Recommended Species, and selecting North Carolina on the US map, limiting the search to shrubs and winnowing out species that might fit the site. The plants chosen are suited to a variety of soils, drainage and sunlight conditions, since you haven't specified those parameters. In addition to our suggestions there is a link below to a list of recommended native plants for North and South Carolina from the North Carolina Native Plant Society.


Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)


Comptonia peregrina (sweet fern)

Fothergilla gardenii (dwarf witchalder)


Hypericum prolificum (shrubby St. Johnswort)

Lantana urticoides (West Indian shrubverbena)

Physocarpus opulifolius (common ninebark)

Zenobia pulverulenta (honeycup)

Plant Native for North and South Carolina 


Callicarpa americana

Comptonia peregrina

Fothergilla gardenii

Hypericum prolificum

Lantana urticoides

Physocarpus opulifolius

Zenobia pulverulenta



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