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Wednesday - September 16, 2009

From: Philadelphia, PA
Region: Select Region
Topic: Medicinal Plants
Title: medicinal uses of Rudbeckia triloba
Answered by: Dean Garrett

QUESTION:

Browneyed Susan, Brown-eyed-Susan, Thin-leaved coneflower, Three-lobed Rudbeckia Rudbeckia triloba L My question relates to the above species. I am doing research on historically medicinal plants. I noticed medicinal uses associated with the Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) but not for the brown-eyed. Are there no confirmed medicinal uses of the brown-eyed? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Here's information about Rudbeckia triloba from the Natural Resources Conservation Service's Ethnobotany of Culturally Significant Plants:

"Flower petals were ground up and made into a soup or tea and used for dropsy, flux and some private diseases, as a diuretic, tonic, a soothing agent, cardiovascular problems, and given to children with worms.

As a wash, it was used on snakebites, burns, open wounds, and swelling caused by worms.

Tincture of the root was used for earaches."

I'm not sure what their sources were, but two good ones are Native American Ethnobotany and Native American Medicinal Plants: An Ethnobotanical Dictionary, both by anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman.

 

From the Image Gallery


Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

Browneyed susan
Rudbeckia triloba

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