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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Monday - July 21, 2008

From: Tupelo, MS
Region: Southeast
Topic: Trees
Title: Will desert willow (Chlopsis linearis) grow in N. E. Mississippi
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am located in N.E. Mississippi. A friend of mine sent me a few desert willow seeds. I have about 5 plants growing now that are about 6 inches tall. I was wanting to know first of all, is it possible for this plant to survive in this area and if so can you give me any tips on caring for it. Thanks for any help!

ANSWER:

Chilopsis linearis (desert willow) is adapted to the hot arid regions of the Southwest and is hardy to USDA Zone 7B, according to the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service description.  Tupelo is in USDA Hardiness Zone 7A or 7B so the winter temperature shouldn't be a problem, especially if you place the trees in a protected location.  A potential problem is too much moisture.  Since the desert willow, as its name suggests, lives in arid regions, it is not likely to tolerate having its "feet" stay wet.  If you are putting it in the ground, make sure the area has very good drainage.  You might do best planting your plants in large containers with a high component of sand in the soil to ensure adequate drainage.  

 


Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

 

 

 

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