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Wednesday - June 11, 2008

From: Arlington, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Large shrub for screen in shade
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am trying to find some large shrubs that will thrive in shade in the north Texas climate. This area will receive very little light during the day but need to grow quite large to hide a fence and creek beyond the fence.

ANSWER:

Below are several large shrubs/small trees that should work well for a screening shrub in Tarrant County, Texas.

Note: shade = <2 hours of sun/day and part shade = 2-6 hours of sun/day

Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood) part shade, shade

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) evergreen—sun, part shade

Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita) evergreen—sun, part shade

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry) part shade

Frangula caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn) part shade

Ilex decidua (possumhaw) sun, part shade

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon) evergreen—part shade

Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas barometer bush) evergreen—sun, part shade

Ptelea trifoliata (common hoptree) sun, part shade, shade

Rhus glabra (smooth sumac) sun, part shade, shade

Rhus lanceolata (prairie sumac) sun, part shade

Viburnum rufidulum (rusty blackhaw) part shade


Cornus drummondii

Morella cerifera

Mahonia trifoliolata

Callicarpa americana

Frangula caroliniana

Ilex decidua

Ilex vomitoria

Leucophyllum frutescens

Ptelea trifoliata

Rhus glabra

Rhus lanceolata

Viburnum rufidulum

 

 

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