En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Native trees to replace dying Arizona ash (Fraxinus velutina)

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - June 06, 2008

From: Bruceville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Native trees to replace dying Arizona ash (Fraxinus velutina)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have two 25-30 year old Arizona Ash trees in my front yard, which I think are dying. They are the only shade my house gets, and I am dreading losing them. (They are massive and beautiful) What are my best options for fast-growing, AND long-living, replacements. I live between Waco and Temple (Bruceville, Tx) and if you dig you find rock, I believe I've heard it called caliche. Other than that, I don't know much about soil-types??? Please help!!!

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is very sorry about your Arizona Ash trees. Here are six trees that are reasonably fast-growing and long-lived that would be good replacements.

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash) is a small to medium tree (30-45 feet) and is fast-growing and long-lived.

Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash) is a larger tree (50-75 feet) and is fast-growing and hardy.

Ulmus americana (American elm) is large (60-80 feet) and fast-growing.

Ulmus crassifolia (cedar elm) is large (50 to 70 feet) and fast to moderate growth rate.

Quercus macrocarpa (bur oak) is a large tree (up to 100 feet) and is has a rapid growth rate.

Quercus muehlenbergii (chinkapin oak) is medium to large (40-60 feet) with a rapid to moderate growth rate.

These two oaks are resistant to oak wilt.

To see more options for trees, visit the Texas Forest Service's Texas Tree Planting Guide. To ensure that you are looking at trees native to Texas, select "Is a Texas native" under Option 4.

If you are interested in learning more about the soils in McLennan County Texas, it is possible to download a Soil Survey from the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the USDA.


Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Ulmus americana

Ulmus crassifolia

Quercus macrocarpa

Quercus muehlenbergii

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

What will grow under neighbor's overhanging tree in Grosse Pointe Woods MI
May 29, 2011 - My next door neighbor has a beautiful tree that is easily 60 years old and thus not going anywhere. Unfortunately, for me the roots of this tree have extended under a large corner of my back yard. Add...
view the full question and answer

How to prune my Linden tree?
June 17, 2009 - We have a 15 yr old Linden in the backyard. North side of home. It can use some pruning at the lower branches. Which branches do we prune and when? Also we have some river birches back there. Oth...
view the full question and answer

Pruning live oak shoots from San Antonio
September 10, 2011 - I am new to TX and am curious about removing suckers/water sprouts from my Live Oaks. Everything I've read about pruning Live Oaks states that you must paint ALL cuts, so I assume that all means al...
view the full question and answer

Cypress poisonous to livestock from Arlington, TN
December 06, 2012 - Are green giant cypress poisonous to livestock?
view the full question and answer

Removing yaupon hollies from yard in Austin
July 04, 2009 - We recently moved into a home w/ way too many and much too large (20-30') yaupon holly's in the back yard. I had some of them cut down, but they keep coming up from the roots of the old trees. How ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center