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Thursday - September 20, 2007

From: northport, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Trees
Title: Evergreen trees for Long Island, NY
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I live on across from the water on the north shore of Long Island. I would like the names of some hardy trees that are both native to Long Island and also NOT deciduous! I am finding it easy to find lists of shrubs and perennials, but not non-deciduous trees. Your help would be much appreciated!

ANSWER:

A search of the NPIN Native Plant Database recommended tree species list for New York yielded the following list of evergreen species native to your area that are recommended for landscape use:

Chamaecyparis thyoides (Atlantic white cedar)

Ilex opaca (American holly)

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar)

Pinus resinosa (red pine)

Picea rubens (red spruce)

Pinus strobus (eastern white pine)

Pinus virginiana (Virginia pine)

Thuja occidentalis (arborvitae)

Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock)

 

From the Image Gallery


American holly
Ilex opaca

Eastern red cedar
Juniperus virginiana

Eastern white pine
Pinus strobus

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