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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Sunday - July 22, 2012

From: Chico, CA
Region: California
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Trees
Title: Toxicity of Fan Tex Ash tree to horses
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Is the Fan Tex Ash tree toxic to horses?

ANSWER:

When Mr. Smarty Plants gets questions about toxic plants, he heads to the Toxic Plant Databases listed below. I could find no listing for the Fan Tex Ash. Not finding a listing doesn't gaurantee that it is non toxic, but it lessens the probability.

California Poison Control System

ASPCA,Toxic plants for Horses 

Toxic Plants of Texas       

University of Arkansas

 Poisonous Plants of South Carolina 

For a little background on the tree, this is an excerpt from a previous answer.

Fantex is a cultivar of Fraxinus velutina (Arizona ash). Rather, Fantex is a "sport", or mutant form, of ash that was selected and developed by Fanick's Nursery in San Antonio for its different leaf type—its leaves are smooth; whereas the regular F. velutina leaves are somewhat fuzzy on the underside. There is, however, great variety in the texture of the leaves of this species. Additionally, Fantex apparently has a thicker leaf and is sterile (producing no seeds). It is always grafted onto Fraxinus velutina root stock according to the Pima Arizona Cooperative Extension.


 

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