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Saturday - April 07, 2012

From: Center Hill, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Privacy Screening, Shrubs
Title: Hedgerow plants non-toxic to horses
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What would be a good, fast growing, hedgerow plant that is NON-POISONOUS TO HORSES? Thank you.

ANSWER:

You can see "Natives to Grow in SUMTER County" on the Florida Native Plant Society webpage.   Here are some plants from that list that are evergreen or semi-evergreen and would make good hedgerow plants.  None of them are listed in any of the Toxic Plant Databases listed below.

Baccharis halimifolia (Groundseltree) is semi-evergreen and the remainder of the plants listed are evergreen.

Ilex glabra (Inkberry)

 Morella cerifera (Wax myrtle)

Psychotria nervosa (Seminole balsamo) and here are more photos and information

Rhapidophyllum hystrix (Needle palm)

Sabal minor (Dwarf palmetto)

Serenoa repens (Saw palmetto) and here are more photos and information

 

TOXIC PLANT DATABASES

ASPCA's Toxic and Non-Toxic Plant List - Horses  [Note:  The first list is for plants toxic to horses and the second list is for plants non-toxic to horses.]

Horse Nutrition: Poisonous Plants from Ohio State University Extension Service

10 Most Poisonous Plants for Horses from Equisearch

Pennsylvania's Poisonous Plants from the Universtiy of Pennsylvania

Cornell University Plants Poisonous to Livestock

Toxic Plants of Texas

Poisonous Plants of North Carolina

 

From the Image Gallery


Groundseltree
Baccharis halimifolia

Inkberry
Ilex glabra

Wax myrtle
Morella cerifera

Needle palm
Rhapidophyllum hystrix

Dwarf palmetto
Sabal minor

Saw palmetto
Serenoa repens

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