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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - September 21, 2009

From: Chevy Chase, MD
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Groundcovers
Title: Groundcover for Maryland to replace English ivy
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is a suitable ground cover native replacement for english ivy? Native to Maryland.

ANSWER:

Hooray for you for replacing your English ivy (Hedera helix)!  Here are several possible alternatives.  Since I don't know your growing conditions (e.g., available sunlight, moisture, etc.) you will need to read the "Growing Conditions" for each plant to be sure that they match your site.

Shrubs:

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (kinnikinnick) evergreen

Empetrum nigrum (black crowberry) evergreen

Cornus canadensis (bunchberry dogwood)

Mitchella repens (partridgeberry) evergreen

Gaultheria procumbens (eastern teaberry) evergreen

Perennial herbs:

Asarum canadense (Canadian wildginger)

Phlox divaricata (wild blue phlox) evergreen

Pachysandra procumbens (Allegheny-spurge) semi-evergreen

Chrysogonum virginianum (green and gold) semi-evergreen

Ferns:

Adiantum pedatum (northern maidenhair)

Polystichum acrostichoides (Christmas fern) evergreen

Grasses/sedges:

Chasmanthium latifolium (Inland sea oats)

Carex pensylvanica (Pennsylvania sedge)

Carex texensis (Texas sedge) evergreen

You can look through our Maryland Recommended list for other possibilities.


Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Empetrum nigrum

Cornus canadensis

Mitchella repens

Gaultheria procumbens

Asarum canadense

Phlox divaricata

Pachysandra procumbens

Chrysogonum virginianum

Adiantum pedatum

Polystichum acrostichoides

Chasmanthium latifolium

Carex pensylvanica

Carex texensis

 

 

 

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