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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Tuesday - March 04, 2008

From: Angel Fire, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Cacti and Succulents
Title: Succulents for 9150 feet in New Mexico
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What succulents could grow in Angel Fire, New Mexico, at an altitude of 9150 ft.in a northwestern windy exposure in rocky-ish soil? Are there any that are perennials? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants found a few succulents that will grow in New Mexico at that elevation but they are all very small. All those listed below are perennials.

Sedum lanceolatum (spearleaf stonecrop)

Sedum wrightii (Wright's stonecrop) (a photo of Sedum wrightii)

Rhodiola integrifolia (ledge stonecrop)

Rhodiola rhodantha and R. integrifolia

Oxyria digyna (alpine mountainsorrel) (more photos of Oxyria digyna)

Claytonia megarhiza (alpine springbeauty) (more photos of Claytonia megarhiza)

Minuarta rubella (beautiful sandwort) (more photos of Minuartia rubella)

Saxifraga caespitosa (tufted alpine saxifrage) (photos of Saxifraga caespitosa)

 

From the Image Gallery


Spearleaf stonecrop
Sedum lanceolatum

Ledge stonecrop
Rhodiola integrifolia ssp. integrifolia

Alpine mountainsorrel
Oxyria digyna

Alpine springbeauty
Claytonia megarhiza

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