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Thursday - April 26, 2007

From: Plano, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Germination of Texas wildflowers in jiffy pots
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

My daughter is planning to grow a Texas Wildflower (indoor for starters) garden for a project. We recently purchased seeds from your store. Will planting them in jiffy pots be sufficient to sprout the seedling? Is there any other source or advice you can give for successful germination?

ANSWER:

Jiffy pots should work just fine for the wildflower seedlings. I don't know what is in your mix, but I am sure that you can find information for at least some of the seeds you have. Most Texas wildflowers do best when planted in the fall and allowed to overwinter and emerge in the spring. You may have some seeds in your mix that will germinate well in the spring, but it is possible that germination rate will not be high.
 

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