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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Tuesday - February 28, 2006

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Plants for winter color in native wildflower meadow backyard
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I am establishing a wildflower meadow in my backyard (150'x50'). it will have native Texas wildflowers, Buffalo Grass and Blue Gramma grass. Is there any plant that you can recommend for winter interest amongst the 'resting' wildflowers and grasses? Thanks very much!

ANSWER:

There aren't too many things that bloom in the wintertime, but you might try some of the windflowers, such as Ten-petaled anemone (Anemone berlandieri). They often pop up in February after a winter rainy spell. Other possibilities are Four-nerve daisy (Tetraneuris scaposa) and Greenthread (Thelesperma filifolium), both of which can be found blooming in February. In some years I have seen Prairie verbena (Glandularia bipinnatifida) blooming in December, January and February, as well. You could also add a few Twisted-leaf yucca (Yucca rupicola) or Coral yucca Hesperaloe parviflora) to your meadow. Their foliage is always interesting to see.
 

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