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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Friday - November 20, 2015

From: Chappell Hill, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Identification of Bidens aristosa (Tickseed sunflower) in Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I think the ID of the plant I submitted a description of yesterday is Tickseed Sunflower (Bidens aristosa). Thanks.

ANSWER:

Unfortunately, for some reason, we did not receive your description of a plant, but it is certainly possible that the plant you described was Bidens aristosa (Bearded beggarticks or Tickseed sunflower) since it has been reported as occurring in Burleson, Robertson, Grimes, Waller, Harris and Austin Counties surrounding Washington County (see the USDA Plants Database distribution map).

Other species of Bidens also occur near Washington CountyThey are

Bidens bipinnata (Spanish needles), occurs in counties near and adjacent to Washington County also (see USDA Plants Database distribution map),  Here are photographs and more information from Missouri Plants.

Bidens discoidea (Small beggarticks) (see USDA Plants Database distribution map

Bidens frondosa (Devil's beggartick) (see the USDA Plants Database distribution map and

Bidens laevis (Smooth beggartick) (see the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

 

From the Image Gallery


Bearded beggarticks
Bidens aristosa

Small beggarticks
Bidens discoidea

Devil's beggartick
Bidens frondosa

Smooth beggartick
Bidens laevis

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